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Feedback to clinicians on preventable factors can reduce hospital onset Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia rates.
J Hosp Infect 2011; 79(2):108-14JH

Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, yet there are limited data on preventable factors. This study aimed to evaluate SAB episodes at a tertiary care hospital; to identify factors that, if avoided, might have prevented the episode of SAB; and to provide feedback to treating clinicians. Of 187 episodes of SAB over 19 months 59.9% were caused by meticillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and 40.1% meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), 65.8% of SAB were healthcare-associated (HA) and 34.2% were community-acquired. Seven- and 30-day mortality rates, overall, were 11.2% and 20.9% respectively. At least one preventable factor was identified in 50.4% of HA-SAB episodes, including recent nosocomial MRSA acquisition in 53.7% MRSAB episodes and one or more factors associated with intravenous access in at least 24.3% of HA (35.7% of hospital onset) cases. SAB was more likely to be associated with at least one identifiable, preventable factor in surgical than in medical inpatients (86.2% vs 54.5%, P=0.004). Patients with HA-MRSAB were more likely than those with HA-MSSAB to require intensive care unit admission (44.4% vs 18.8%, P=0.003). Identifying and addressing preventable factors will better target resources for prevention of SAB. Feedback about preventable factors was associated with a reduction in HA-SAB rates from 0.29 to 0.20 per 1000 occupied bed-days, from 2008 to 2009.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Infectious Diseases and Microbiology Laboratory Services, Institute of Clinical Pathology and Medical Research, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, New South Wales, Australia. jen.kok@swahs.health.nsw.gov.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21741724

Citation

Kok, J, et al. "Feedback to Clinicians On Preventable Factors Can Reduce Hospital Onset Staphylococcus Aureus Bacteraemia Rates." The Journal of Hospital Infection, vol. 79, no. 2, 2011, pp. 108-14.
Kok J, O'Sullivan MV, Gilbert GL. Feedback to clinicians on preventable factors can reduce hospital onset Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia rates. J Hosp Infect. 2011;79(2):108-14.
Kok, J., O'Sullivan, M. V., & Gilbert, G. L. (2011). Feedback to clinicians on preventable factors can reduce hospital onset Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia rates. The Journal of Hospital Infection, 79(2), pp. 108-14. doi:10.1016/j.jhin.2011.04.023.
Kok J, O'Sullivan MV, Gilbert GL. Feedback to Clinicians On Preventable Factors Can Reduce Hospital Onset Staphylococcus Aureus Bacteraemia Rates. J Hosp Infect. 2011;79(2):108-14. PubMed PMID: 21741724.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Feedback to clinicians on preventable factors can reduce hospital onset Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia rates. AU - Kok,J, AU - O'Sullivan,M V, AU - Gilbert,G L, Y1 - 2011/07/08/ PY - 2010/11/04/received PY - 2011/04/23/accepted PY - 2011/7/12/entrez PY - 2011/7/12/pubmed PY - 2012/1/6/medline SP - 108 EP - 14 JF - The Journal of hospital infection JO - J. Hosp. Infect. VL - 79 IS - 2 N2 - Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, yet there are limited data on preventable factors. This study aimed to evaluate SAB episodes at a tertiary care hospital; to identify factors that, if avoided, might have prevented the episode of SAB; and to provide feedback to treating clinicians. Of 187 episodes of SAB over 19 months 59.9% were caused by meticillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and 40.1% meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), 65.8% of SAB were healthcare-associated (HA) and 34.2% were community-acquired. Seven- and 30-day mortality rates, overall, were 11.2% and 20.9% respectively. At least one preventable factor was identified in 50.4% of HA-SAB episodes, including recent nosocomial MRSA acquisition in 53.7% MRSAB episodes and one or more factors associated with intravenous access in at least 24.3% of HA (35.7% of hospital onset) cases. SAB was more likely to be associated with at least one identifiable, preventable factor in surgical than in medical inpatients (86.2% vs 54.5%, P=0.004). Patients with HA-MRSAB were more likely than those with HA-MSSAB to require intensive care unit admission (44.4% vs 18.8%, P=0.003). Identifying and addressing preventable factors will better target resources for prevention of SAB. Feedback about preventable factors was associated with a reduction in HA-SAB rates from 0.29 to 0.20 per 1000 occupied bed-days, from 2008 to 2009. SN - 1532-2939 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21741724/Feedback_to_clinicians_on_preventable_factors_can_reduce_hospital_onset_Staphylococcus_aureus_bacteraemia_rates_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0195-6701(11)00202-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -