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Conspiracist ideation in Britain and Austria: evidence of a monological belief system and associations between individual psychological differences and real-world and fictitious conspiracy theories.
Br J Psychol 2011; 102(3):443-63BJ

Abstract

Despite evidence of widespread belief in conspiracy theories, there remains a dearth of research on the individual difference correlates of conspiracist ideation. In two studies, we sought to overcome this limitation by examining correlations between conspiracist ideation and a range of individual psychological factors. In Study 1, 817 Britons indicated their agreement with conspiracist ideation concerning the July 7, 2005 (7/7), London bombings, and completed a battery of individual difference scales. Results showed that stronger belief in 7/7 conspiracy theories was predicted by stronger belief in other real-world conspiracy theories, greater exposure to conspiracist ideation, higher political cynicism, greater support for democratic principles, more negative attitudes to authority, lower self-esteem, and lower Agreeableness. In Study 2, 281 Austrians indicated their agreement with an entirely fictitious conspiracy theory and completed a battery of individual difference measures not examined in Study 1. Results showed that belief in the entirely fictitious conspiracy theory was significantly associated with stronger belief in other real-world conspiracy theories, stronger paranormal beliefs, and lower crystallized intelligence. These results are discussed in terms of the potential of identifying individual difference constellations among conspiracy theorists.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Westminster, London, UK. v.swami@wmin.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21751999

Citation

Swami, Viren, et al. "Conspiracist Ideation in Britain and Austria: Evidence of a Monological Belief System and Associations Between Individual Psychological Differences and Real-world and Fictitious Conspiracy Theories." British Journal of Psychology (London, England : 1953), vol. 102, no. 3, 2011, pp. 443-63.
Swami V, Coles R, Stieger S, et al. Conspiracist ideation in Britain and Austria: evidence of a monological belief system and associations between individual psychological differences and real-world and fictitious conspiracy theories. Br J Psychol. 2011;102(3):443-63.
Swami, V., Coles, R., Stieger, S., Pietschnig, J., Furnham, A., Rehim, S., & Voracek, M. (2011). Conspiracist ideation in Britain and Austria: evidence of a monological belief system and associations between individual psychological differences and real-world and fictitious conspiracy theories. British Journal of Psychology (London, England : 1953), 102(3), pp. 443-63. doi:10.1111/j.2044-8295.2010.02004.x.
Swami V, et al. Conspiracist Ideation in Britain and Austria: Evidence of a Monological Belief System and Associations Between Individual Psychological Differences and Real-world and Fictitious Conspiracy Theories. Br J Psychol. 2011;102(3):443-63. PubMed PMID: 21751999.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Conspiracist ideation in Britain and Austria: evidence of a monological belief system and associations between individual psychological differences and real-world and fictitious conspiracy theories. AU - Swami,Viren, AU - Coles,Rebecca, AU - Stieger,Stefan, AU - Pietschnig,Jakob, AU - Furnham,Adrian, AU - Rehim,Sherry, AU - Voracek,Martin, Y1 - 2011/02/25/ PY - 2011/7/15/entrez PY - 2011/7/15/pubmed PY - 2011/11/16/medline SP - 443 EP - 63 JF - British journal of psychology (London, England : 1953) JO - Br J Psychol VL - 102 IS - 3 N2 - Despite evidence of widespread belief in conspiracy theories, there remains a dearth of research on the individual difference correlates of conspiracist ideation. In two studies, we sought to overcome this limitation by examining correlations between conspiracist ideation and a range of individual psychological factors. In Study 1, 817 Britons indicated their agreement with conspiracist ideation concerning the July 7, 2005 (7/7), London bombings, and completed a battery of individual difference scales. Results showed that stronger belief in 7/7 conspiracy theories was predicted by stronger belief in other real-world conspiracy theories, greater exposure to conspiracist ideation, higher political cynicism, greater support for democratic principles, more negative attitudes to authority, lower self-esteem, and lower Agreeableness. In Study 2, 281 Austrians indicated their agreement with an entirely fictitious conspiracy theory and completed a battery of individual difference measures not examined in Study 1. Results showed that belief in the entirely fictitious conspiracy theory was significantly associated with stronger belief in other real-world conspiracy theories, stronger paranormal beliefs, and lower crystallized intelligence. These results are discussed in terms of the potential of identifying individual difference constellations among conspiracy theorists. SN - 2044-8295 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21751999/Conspiracist_ideation_in_Britain_and_Austria:_evidence_of_a_monological_belief_system_and_associations_between_individual_psychological_differences_and_real_world_and_fictitious_conspiracy_theories_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.2044-8295.2010.02004.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -