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Association of self-reported snoring with carotid artery intima-media thickness and plaque.
J Sleep Res 2012; 21(1):87-93JS

Abstract

Previous studies have suggested that self-reported snoring is associated with atherosclerotic vascular diseases. However, the role of self-reported snoring as an independent risk factor for subclinical atherosclerosis has not been well established. This study aimed to evaluate whether and to what extent self-reported snoring is associated with subclinical carotid atherosclerosis after adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Carotid intima-media thickness and plaque were investigated with ultrasonography in 1245 urban Chinese aged 50-79 years between September 2007 and November 2007. Information on self-reported snoring and measurements of traditional cardiovascular risk factors was also collected. A total of 1050 participants were involved in the final analysis. The prevalence of self-reported snoring habitually (snoring frequency ≥5 days per week) was 31.5, and 64.3% of the participants in this population had a history of snoring. The mean values of the maximum intima-media thickness of bifurcation and common carotid arteries in snorers were significantly higher than in non-snorers (1.08 ± 0.14 mm versus 1.04 ± 0.14 mm, P < 0.001, in carotid bifurcation; 1.03 ± 0.15 mm versus 1.00 ± 0.15 mm, P = 0.002, in common carotid artery). After adjustment for traditional cardiovascular risk factors, logistic regression analysis showed that the odds ratio of self-reported snoring habitually for increased intima-media thickness and carotid bifurcation plaque was 1.71 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.22-2.39; P = 0.002] and 3.63 (95% CI: 2.57-5.12; P < 0.001), respectively. In conclusion, the current study suggested that self-reported snoring is associated significantly with carotid bifurcation intima-media thickness and the presence of plaque, independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, Capital Medical University Affiliated Beijing Anzhen Hospital and Beijing Institute of Heart, Lung and Blood Vessel Diseases, No. 2 Anzhen Street, Beijing, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21752134

Citation

Li, Yan, et al. "Association of Self-reported Snoring With Carotid Artery Intima-media Thickness and Plaque." Journal of Sleep Research, vol. 21, no. 1, 2012, pp. 87-93.
Li Y, Liu J, Wang W, et al. Association of self-reported snoring with carotid artery intima-media thickness and plaque. J Sleep Res. 2012;21(1):87-93.
Li, Y., Liu, J., Wang, W., Yong, Q., Zhou, G., Wang, M., ... Zhao, D. (2012). Association of self-reported snoring with carotid artery intima-media thickness and plaque. Journal of Sleep Research, 21(1), pp. 87-93. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2869.2011.00936.x.
Li Y, et al. Association of Self-reported Snoring With Carotid Artery Intima-media Thickness and Plaque. J Sleep Res. 2012;21(1):87-93. PubMed PMID: 21752134.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association of self-reported snoring with carotid artery intima-media thickness and plaque. AU - Li,Yan, AU - Liu,Jing, AU - Wang,Wei, AU - Yong,Qiang, AU - Zhou,Guanghua, AU - Wang,Miao, AU - Sun,Jiayi, AU - Zhao,Dong, Y1 - 2011/07/14/ PY - 2011/7/15/entrez PY - 2011/7/15/pubmed PY - 2012/6/5/medline SP - 87 EP - 93 JF - Journal of sleep research JO - J Sleep Res VL - 21 IS - 1 N2 - Previous studies have suggested that self-reported snoring is associated with atherosclerotic vascular diseases. However, the role of self-reported snoring as an independent risk factor for subclinical atherosclerosis has not been well established. This study aimed to evaluate whether and to what extent self-reported snoring is associated with subclinical carotid atherosclerosis after adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Carotid intima-media thickness and plaque were investigated with ultrasonography in 1245 urban Chinese aged 50-79 years between September 2007 and November 2007. Information on self-reported snoring and measurements of traditional cardiovascular risk factors was also collected. A total of 1050 participants were involved in the final analysis. The prevalence of self-reported snoring habitually (snoring frequency ≥5 days per week) was 31.5, and 64.3% of the participants in this population had a history of snoring. The mean values of the maximum intima-media thickness of bifurcation and common carotid arteries in snorers were significantly higher than in non-snorers (1.08 ± 0.14 mm versus 1.04 ± 0.14 mm, P < 0.001, in carotid bifurcation; 1.03 ± 0.15 mm versus 1.00 ± 0.15 mm, P = 0.002, in common carotid artery). After adjustment for traditional cardiovascular risk factors, logistic regression analysis showed that the odds ratio of self-reported snoring habitually for increased intima-media thickness and carotid bifurcation plaque was 1.71 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.22-2.39; P = 0.002] and 3.63 (95% CI: 2.57-5.12; P < 0.001), respectively. In conclusion, the current study suggested that self-reported snoring is associated significantly with carotid bifurcation intima-media thickness and the presence of plaque, independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. SN - 1365-2869 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21752134/Association_of_self_reported_snoring_with_carotid_artery_intima_media_thickness_and_plaque_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2869.2011.00936.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -