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Effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccine against pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus, Australia, 2010.
Emerg Infect Dis 2011; 17(7):1181-7EI

Abstract

To estimate effectiveness of seasonal trivalent and monovalent influenza vaccines against pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus, we conducted a test-negative case-control study in Victoria, Australia, in 2010. Patients seen for influenza-like illness by general practitioners in a sentinel surveillance network during 2010 were tested for influenza; vaccination status was recorded. Case-patients had positive PCRs for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus, and controls had negative influenza test results. Of 319 eligible patients, test results for 139 (44%) were pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus positive. Adjusted effectiveness of seasonal vaccine against pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus was 79% (95% confidence interval 33%-93%); effectiveness of monovalent vaccine was 47% and not statistically significant. Vaccine effectiveness was higher among adults. Despite some limitations, this study indicates that the first seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine to include the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus strain provided significant protection against laboratory-confirmed pandemic (H1N1) 2009 infection.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Victorian Infectious Diseases Reference Laboratory, North Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. james.fielding@mh.org.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21762570

Citation

Fielding, James E., et al. "Effectiveness of Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Against Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus, Australia, 2010." Emerging Infectious Diseases, vol. 17, no. 7, 2011, pp. 1181-7.
Fielding JE, Grant KA, Garcia K, et al. Effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccine against pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus, Australia, 2010. Emerging Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1181-7.
Fielding, J. E., Grant, K. A., Garcia, K., & Kelly, H. A. (2011). Effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccine against pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus, Australia, 2010. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), pp. 1181-7. doi:10.3201/eid1707.101959.
Fielding JE, et al. Effectiveness of Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Against Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus, Australia, 2010. Emerging Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1181-7. PubMed PMID: 21762570.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccine against pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus, Australia, 2010. AU - Fielding,James E, AU - Grant,Kristina A, AU - Garcia,Katherine, AU - Kelly,Heath A, PY - 2011/7/19/entrez PY - 2011/7/19/pubmed PY - 2012/1/13/medline SP - 1181 EP - 7 JF - Emerging infectious diseases JO - Emerging Infect. Dis. VL - 17 IS - 7 N2 - To estimate effectiveness of seasonal trivalent and monovalent influenza vaccines against pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus, we conducted a test-negative case-control study in Victoria, Australia, in 2010. Patients seen for influenza-like illness by general practitioners in a sentinel surveillance network during 2010 were tested for influenza; vaccination status was recorded. Case-patients had positive PCRs for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus, and controls had negative influenza test results. Of 319 eligible patients, test results for 139 (44%) were pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus positive. Adjusted effectiveness of seasonal vaccine against pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus was 79% (95% confidence interval 33%-93%); effectiveness of monovalent vaccine was 47% and not statistically significant. Vaccine effectiveness was higher among adults. Despite some limitations, this study indicates that the first seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine to include the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus strain provided significant protection against laboratory-confirmed pandemic (H1N1) 2009 infection. SN - 1080-6059 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21762570/Effectiveness_of_seasonal_influenza_vaccine_against_pandemic__H1N1__2009_virus_Australia_2010_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101959 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -