Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Ten-year trends and risk factors for non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli found through Shiga toxin testing, Connecticut, 2000-2009.
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Aug 01; 53(3):269-76.CI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The epidemiology over time of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is unknown. Since 1999, increasing numbers of laboratories in Connecticut have been testing for ST rather than culturing for O157, enabling identification of non-O157 STEC.

METHODS

Beginning in 2000, Connecticut laboratories were required to submit ST-positive broths to the State Laboratory for isolation and typing of STEC. The ratio of non-O157:O157 from laboratories conducting ST testing was used to determine state-level estimates for non-O157 STEC. Patients with STEC were interviewed for exposure factors in the 7 days preceding illness. Incidence trends, clinical features, and epidemiology of non-O157 and O157 STEC infections were compared.

RESULTS

From 1 January 2000 through 31 December 2009, ST testing detected 392 (59%) of 663 reported STEC infections; 229 (58%) of the isolates were non-O157. The estimated incidence of STEC infection decreased by 34%. O157 and the top 4 non-O157 serogroups, O111, O103, O26, and O45, were a stable percentage of all STEC isolates over the 10-year period. Bloody diarrhea, hospitalization, and hemolytic uremic syndrome were more common in patients with O157 STEC than in patients with non-O157 STEC infection. Exposure risks of patients with non-O157 STEC infection differed from those of patients with O157 STEC infection primarily in international travel (15.3% vs 2.5%; P < .01). Non-O157 types differed from each other with respect to several epidemiologic and exposure features.

CONCLUSIONS

Both O157 and non-O157 STEC infection incidence decreased from 2000 through 2009. Although infection due to O157 is the most common and clinically severe STEC infection, it accounts for a minority of all clinically significant STEC infections. STEC appear to be a diverse group of organisms that have some differences as well as many epidemiologic and exposure features in common.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Emerging Infections Program, Division of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases, Yale University School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. hadler-epi@att.netNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21765075

Citation

Hadler, James L., et al. "Ten-year Trends and Risk Factors for non-O157 Shiga Toxin-producing Escherichia Coli Found Through Shiga Toxin Testing, Connecticut, 2000-2009." Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 53, no. 3, 2011, pp. 269-76.
Hadler JL, Clogher P, Hurd S, et al. Ten-year trends and risk factors for non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli found through Shiga toxin testing, Connecticut, 2000-2009. Clin Infect Dis. 2011;53(3):269-76.
Hadler, J. L., Clogher, P., Hurd, S., Phan, Q., Mandour, M., Bemis, K., & Marcus, R. (2011). Ten-year trends and risk factors for non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli found through Shiga toxin testing, Connecticut, 2000-2009. Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 53(3), 269-76. https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/cir377
Hadler JL, et al. Ten-year Trends and Risk Factors for non-O157 Shiga Toxin-producing Escherichia Coli Found Through Shiga Toxin Testing, Connecticut, 2000-2009. Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Aug 1;53(3):269-76. PubMed PMID: 21765075.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ten-year trends and risk factors for non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli found through Shiga toxin testing, Connecticut, 2000-2009. AU - Hadler,James L, AU - Clogher,Paula, AU - Hurd,Sharon, AU - Phan,Quyen, AU - Mandour,Mona, AU - Bemis,Kelley, AU - Marcus,Ruthanne, PY - 2011/7/19/entrez PY - 2011/7/19/pubmed PY - 2011/11/9/medline SP - 269 EP - 76 JF - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America JO - Clin. Infect. Dis. VL - 53 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: The epidemiology over time of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is unknown. Since 1999, increasing numbers of laboratories in Connecticut have been testing for ST rather than culturing for O157, enabling identification of non-O157 STEC. METHODS: Beginning in 2000, Connecticut laboratories were required to submit ST-positive broths to the State Laboratory for isolation and typing of STEC. The ratio of non-O157:O157 from laboratories conducting ST testing was used to determine state-level estimates for non-O157 STEC. Patients with STEC were interviewed for exposure factors in the 7 days preceding illness. Incidence trends, clinical features, and epidemiology of non-O157 and O157 STEC infections were compared. RESULTS: From 1 January 2000 through 31 December 2009, ST testing detected 392 (59%) of 663 reported STEC infections; 229 (58%) of the isolates were non-O157. The estimated incidence of STEC infection decreased by 34%. O157 and the top 4 non-O157 serogroups, O111, O103, O26, and O45, were a stable percentage of all STEC isolates over the 10-year period. Bloody diarrhea, hospitalization, and hemolytic uremic syndrome were more common in patients with O157 STEC than in patients with non-O157 STEC infection. Exposure risks of patients with non-O157 STEC infection differed from those of patients with O157 STEC infection primarily in international travel (15.3% vs 2.5%; P < .01). Non-O157 types differed from each other with respect to several epidemiologic and exposure features. CONCLUSIONS: Both O157 and non-O157 STEC infection incidence decreased from 2000 through 2009. Although infection due to O157 is the most common and clinically severe STEC infection, it accounts for a minority of all clinically significant STEC infections. STEC appear to be a diverse group of organisms that have some differences as well as many epidemiologic and exposure features in common. SN - 1537-6591 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21765075/Ten_year_trends_and_risk_factors_for_non_O157_Shiga_toxin_producing_Escherichia_coli_found_through_Shiga_toxin_testing_Connecticut_2000_2009_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/cid/cir377 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -