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Efficacy of neonatal release of ankyloglossia: a randomized trial.
Pediatrics 2011; 128(2):280-8Ped

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Ankyloglossia has been associated with a variety of infant-feeding problems. Frenotomy commonly is performed for relief of ankyloglossia, but there has been a lack of convincing data to support this practice.

OBJECTIVES

Our primary objective was to determine whether frenotomy for infants with ankyloglossia improved maternal nipple pain and ability to breastfeed. A secondary objective was to determine whether frenotomy improved the length of breastfeeding.

METHODS

Over a 12-month period, neonates who had difficulty breastfeeding and significant ankyloglossia were enrolled in this randomized, single-blinded, controlled trial and assigned to either a frenotomy (30 infants) or a sham procedure (28 infants). Breastfeeding was assessed by a preintervention and postintervention nipple-pain scale and the Infant Breastfeeding Assessment Tool. The same tools were used at the 2-week follow-up and regularly scheduled follow-ups over a 1-year period. The infants in the sham group were given a frenotomy before or at the 2-week follow-up if it was desired.

RESULTS

Both groups demonstrated statistically significantly decreased pain scores after the intervention. The frenotomy group improved significantly more than the sham group (P < .001). Breastfeeding scores significantly improved in the frenotomy group (P = .029) without a significant change in the control group. All but 1 parent in the sham group elected to have the procedure performed when their infant reached 2 weeks of age, which prevented additional comparisons between the 2 groups.

CONCLUSIONS

We demonstrated immediate improvement in nipple-pain and breastfeeding scores, despite a placebo effect on nipple pain. This should provide convincing evidence for those seeking a frenotomy for infants with signficant ankyloglossia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA 23708, USA. melissa.buryk@gmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21768318

Citation

Buryk, Melissa, et al. "Efficacy of Neonatal Release of Ankyloglossia: a Randomized Trial." Pediatrics, vol. 128, no. 2, 2011, pp. 280-8.
Buryk M, Bloom D, Shope T. Efficacy of neonatal release of ankyloglossia: a randomized trial. Pediatrics. 2011;128(2):280-8.
Buryk, M., Bloom, D., & Shope, T. (2011). Efficacy of neonatal release of ankyloglossia: a randomized trial. Pediatrics, 128(2), pp. 280-8. doi:10.1542/peds.2011-0077.
Buryk M, Bloom D, Shope T. Efficacy of Neonatal Release of Ankyloglossia: a Randomized Trial. Pediatrics. 2011;128(2):280-8. PubMed PMID: 21768318.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Efficacy of neonatal release of ankyloglossia: a randomized trial. AU - Buryk,Melissa, AU - Bloom,David, AU - Shope,Timothy, Y1 - 2011/07/18/ PY - 2011/7/20/entrez PY - 2011/7/20/pubmed PY - 2011/10/14/medline SP - 280 EP - 8 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 128 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Ankyloglossia has been associated with a variety of infant-feeding problems. Frenotomy commonly is performed for relief of ankyloglossia, but there has been a lack of convincing data to support this practice. OBJECTIVES: Our primary objective was to determine whether frenotomy for infants with ankyloglossia improved maternal nipple pain and ability to breastfeed. A secondary objective was to determine whether frenotomy improved the length of breastfeeding. METHODS: Over a 12-month period, neonates who had difficulty breastfeeding and significant ankyloglossia were enrolled in this randomized, single-blinded, controlled trial and assigned to either a frenotomy (30 infants) or a sham procedure (28 infants). Breastfeeding was assessed by a preintervention and postintervention nipple-pain scale and the Infant Breastfeeding Assessment Tool. The same tools were used at the 2-week follow-up and regularly scheduled follow-ups over a 1-year period. The infants in the sham group were given a frenotomy before or at the 2-week follow-up if it was desired. RESULTS: Both groups demonstrated statistically significantly decreased pain scores after the intervention. The frenotomy group improved significantly more than the sham group (P < .001). Breastfeeding scores significantly improved in the frenotomy group (P = .029) without a significant change in the control group. All but 1 parent in the sham group elected to have the procedure performed when their infant reached 2 weeks of age, which prevented additional comparisons between the 2 groups. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrated immediate improvement in nipple-pain and breastfeeding scores, despite a placebo effect on nipple pain. This should provide convincing evidence for those seeking a frenotomy for infants with signficant ankyloglossia. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21768318/Efficacy_of_neonatal_release_of_ankyloglossia:_a_randomized_trial_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=21768318 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -