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Tomato allergy: impact of genotype and environmental factors on the biological response.
J Sci Food Agric. 2011 Sep; 91(12):2234-40.JS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Food allergies are increasing in the European population. At present the onset of symptoms can be avoided only by elimination of a particular fruit or vegetable from the diet. A new approach is to develop hypoallergenic food products. This study characterises the allergenic potential of tomatoes, considering cultivation conditions, developmental stages and genotypes, in order to identify hypoallergenic fruits.

RESULTS

Patients with a history of tomato allergy were recruited for skin allergy tests. Tomatoes carrying distinct genotypes were grown under various cultivation conditions and harvested at different maturation stages. Cultivation conditions (nitrogen fertilisation, light exposure and plant nutrition) did not affect the skin reactivity in tomato-allergic patients. However, skin reactivity was significantly lower when using green-unripe compared with red-ripe tomatoes and when using landrace cultivars compared with cultivars bred for use in organic horticulture.

CONCLUSION

Depending on their genetic background and maturity level, some tomato cultivars elicit positive reactions in tomato-allergic patients in the skin allergy test. This novel finding should pave the way for the development of tomatoes with reduced allergenicity to relieve sufferers of tomato allergy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Allergy-Centre-Charité, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21769872

Citation

Dölle, Sabine, et al. "Tomato Allergy: Impact of Genotype and Environmental Factors On the Biological Response." Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, vol. 91, no. 12, 2011, pp. 2234-40.
Dölle S, Schwarz D, Lehmann K, et al. Tomato allergy: impact of genotype and environmental factors on the biological response. J Sci Food Agric. 2011;91(12):2234-40.
Dölle, S., Schwarz, D., Lehmann, K., Weckwerth, W., George, E., Worm, M., & Franken, P. (2011). Tomato allergy: impact of genotype and environmental factors on the biological response. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, 91(12), 2234-40. https://doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.4443
Dölle S, et al. Tomato Allergy: Impact of Genotype and Environmental Factors On the Biological Response. J Sci Food Agric. 2011;91(12):2234-40. PubMed PMID: 21769872.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Tomato allergy: impact of genotype and environmental factors on the biological response. AU - Dölle,Sabine, AU - Schwarz,Dietmar, AU - Lehmann,Karola, AU - Weckwerth,Wolfram, AU - George,Eckhard, AU - Worm,Margitta, AU - Franken,Philipp, Y1 - 2011/07/18/ PY - 2010/07/29/received PY - 2010/11/19/revised PY - 2011/03/24/accepted PY - 2011/7/20/entrez PY - 2011/7/20/pubmed PY - 2012/1/6/medline SP - 2234 EP - 40 JF - Journal of the science of food and agriculture JO - J Sci Food Agric VL - 91 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Food allergies are increasing in the European population. At present the onset of symptoms can be avoided only by elimination of a particular fruit or vegetable from the diet. A new approach is to develop hypoallergenic food products. This study characterises the allergenic potential of tomatoes, considering cultivation conditions, developmental stages and genotypes, in order to identify hypoallergenic fruits. RESULTS: Patients with a history of tomato allergy were recruited for skin allergy tests. Tomatoes carrying distinct genotypes were grown under various cultivation conditions and harvested at different maturation stages. Cultivation conditions (nitrogen fertilisation, light exposure and plant nutrition) did not affect the skin reactivity in tomato-allergic patients. However, skin reactivity was significantly lower when using green-unripe compared with red-ripe tomatoes and when using landrace cultivars compared with cultivars bred for use in organic horticulture. CONCLUSION: Depending on their genetic background and maturity level, some tomato cultivars elicit positive reactions in tomato-allergic patients in the skin allergy test. This novel finding should pave the way for the development of tomatoes with reduced allergenicity to relieve sufferers of tomato allergy. SN - 1097-0010 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21769872/Tomato_allergy:_impact_of_genotype_and_environmental_factors_on_the_biological_response_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.4443 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -