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Experiences of psychosis in borderline personality disorder: a qualitative analysis.
J Ment Health. 2011 Aug; 20(4):381-91.JM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

From clinical work and research it is clear that people suffering from borderline personality disorder (BPD) often complain of psychotic symptoms including hallucinations, yet little is known about how service users experience these symptoms.

AIMS

The aim of this study was to examine the experience of psychotic symptoms in people with BPD and to establish how mental health professionals responded to reports of psychotic symptoms.

METHOD

Seven semi-structured interviews were carried out with service users with BPD who had been known to present with psychotic symptoms. In parallel, medical case notes of these service users were analysed. Results were subjected to qualitative analysis using techniques of grounded theory.

RESULTS

Psychotic symptoms were often long standing and interfered with physical and emotional functioning. There were no clear distinctions from psychotic symptoms described by patients suffering from schizophrenia. Treating doctors had no common language to describe these symptoms. Furthermore, the language that was used had the implication that the symptoms were not real or true and could therefore be perceived as pejorative.

CONCLUSIONS

It is suggested that the diagnostic category of BPD requires revision to include psychotic symptoms. Terminology such as pseudo- and quasi-psychotic symptoms are confusing and use of these terms should be revised.

Authors+Show Affiliations

York Mental Health Services, North Yorkshire and York Primary Care Trust, York, UK. rdadams@doctors.org.ukNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21770785

Citation

Adams, Bob, and Teri Sanders. "Experiences of Psychosis in Borderline Personality Disorder: a Qualitative Analysis." Journal of Mental Health (Abingdon, England), vol. 20, no. 4, 2011, pp. 381-91.
Adams B, Sanders T. Experiences of psychosis in borderline personality disorder: a qualitative analysis. J Ment Health. 2011;20(4):381-91.
Adams, B., & Sanders, T. (2011). Experiences of psychosis in borderline personality disorder: a qualitative analysis. Journal of Mental Health (Abingdon, England), 20(4), 381-91. https://doi.org/10.3109/09638237.2011.577846
Adams B, Sanders T. Experiences of Psychosis in Borderline Personality Disorder: a Qualitative Analysis. J Ment Health. 2011;20(4):381-91. PubMed PMID: 21770785.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Experiences of psychosis in borderline personality disorder: a qualitative analysis. AU - Adams,Bob, AU - Sanders,Teri, PY - 2011/7/21/entrez PY - 2011/7/21/pubmed PY - 2012/1/19/medline SP - 381 EP - 91 JF - Journal of mental health (Abingdon, England) JO - J Ment Health VL - 20 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: From clinical work and research it is clear that people suffering from borderline personality disorder (BPD) often complain of psychotic symptoms including hallucinations, yet little is known about how service users experience these symptoms. AIMS: The aim of this study was to examine the experience of psychotic symptoms in people with BPD and to establish how mental health professionals responded to reports of psychotic symptoms. METHOD: Seven semi-structured interviews were carried out with service users with BPD who had been known to present with psychotic symptoms. In parallel, medical case notes of these service users were analysed. Results were subjected to qualitative analysis using techniques of grounded theory. RESULTS: Psychotic symptoms were often long standing and interfered with physical and emotional functioning. There were no clear distinctions from psychotic symptoms described by patients suffering from schizophrenia. Treating doctors had no common language to describe these symptoms. Furthermore, the language that was used had the implication that the symptoms were not real or true and could therefore be perceived as pejorative. CONCLUSIONS: It is suggested that the diagnostic category of BPD requires revision to include psychotic symptoms. Terminology such as pseudo- and quasi-psychotic symptoms are confusing and use of these terms should be revised. SN - 1360-0567 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21770785/Experiences_of_psychosis_in_borderline_personality_disorder:_a_qualitative_analysis_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/09638237.2011.577846 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -