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Triglycerides and triglycerides to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio are strong predictors of incident hypertension in Middle Eastern women.
J Hum Hypertens. 2012 Sep; 26(9):525-32.JH

Abstract

Dyslipidemia has been reported as a risk factor for incident hypertension in a few prospective studies, however, no study has specifically assessed different lipid measures including the lipid ratios, that is, total cholesterol (TC)/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglycerides (TGs)/HDL-C as predictors of hypertension among Middle Eastern women with high prevalences of dyslipidemia and hypertension. The study population consisted of 2831 non-hypertensive women, aged ≥ 20 years. We measured lipoproteins, and calculated non-HDL-C and the lipid ratios. The risk-factor-adjusted odds ratios for incident hypertension were calculated for every 1 standard deviation (s.d.) change in TC, log-transformed TG, HDL-C, non-HDL-C, TC/HDL-C and log-transformed TG/HDL-C using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Over a mean follow-up of 6.4 years, 397 women developed hypertension. An increase of 1 s.d. in TG, TC/HDL-C and TG/HDL-C increased the risk of incident hypertension by 16, 19 and 18%, respectively, and 1 s.d. increase in HDL-C decreased the risk of hypertension by 14% in the multivariable model (all P ≤ 0.05). In models excluding women with diabetes and central or general obesity, TG, TG/HDL-C and TC/HDL-C remained as independent predictors of incident hypertension. In conclusion, dyslipidemia, using serum TG and TG/HDL-C, in particular, may be useful in identification of women at risk of hypertension, even in those without diabetes and central or general obesity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Prevention of Metabolic Disorders Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Tohidi@endocrine.ac.irNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21776016

Citation

Tohidi, M, et al. "Triglycerides and Triglycerides to High-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Ratio Are Strong Predictors of Incident Hypertension in Middle Eastern Women." Journal of Human Hypertension, vol. 26, no. 9, 2012, pp. 525-32.
Tohidi M, Hatami M, Hadaegh F, et al. Triglycerides and triglycerides to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio are strong predictors of incident hypertension in Middle Eastern women. J Hum Hypertens. 2012;26(9):525-32.
Tohidi, M., Hatami, M., Hadaegh, F., & Azizi, F. (2012). Triglycerides and triglycerides to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio are strong predictors of incident hypertension in Middle Eastern women. Journal of Human Hypertension, 26(9), 525-32. https://doi.org/10.1038/jhh.2011.70
Tohidi M, et al. Triglycerides and Triglycerides to High-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Ratio Are Strong Predictors of Incident Hypertension in Middle Eastern Women. J Hum Hypertens. 2012;26(9):525-32. PubMed PMID: 21776016.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Triglycerides and triglycerides to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio are strong predictors of incident hypertension in Middle Eastern women. AU - Tohidi,M, AU - Hatami,M, AU - Hadaegh,F, AU - Azizi,F, Y1 - 2011/07/21/ PY - 2011/7/22/entrez PY - 2011/7/22/pubmed PY - 2013/1/18/medline SP - 525 EP - 32 JF - Journal of human hypertension JO - J Hum Hypertens VL - 26 IS - 9 N2 - Dyslipidemia has been reported as a risk factor for incident hypertension in a few prospective studies, however, no study has specifically assessed different lipid measures including the lipid ratios, that is, total cholesterol (TC)/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglycerides (TGs)/HDL-C as predictors of hypertension among Middle Eastern women with high prevalences of dyslipidemia and hypertension. The study population consisted of 2831 non-hypertensive women, aged ≥ 20 years. We measured lipoproteins, and calculated non-HDL-C and the lipid ratios. The risk-factor-adjusted odds ratios for incident hypertension were calculated for every 1 standard deviation (s.d.) change in TC, log-transformed TG, HDL-C, non-HDL-C, TC/HDL-C and log-transformed TG/HDL-C using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Over a mean follow-up of 6.4 years, 397 women developed hypertension. An increase of 1 s.d. in TG, TC/HDL-C and TG/HDL-C increased the risk of incident hypertension by 16, 19 and 18%, respectively, and 1 s.d. increase in HDL-C decreased the risk of hypertension by 14% in the multivariable model (all P ≤ 0.05). In models excluding women with diabetes and central or general obesity, TG, TG/HDL-C and TC/HDL-C remained as independent predictors of incident hypertension. In conclusion, dyslipidemia, using serum TG and TG/HDL-C, in particular, may be useful in identification of women at risk of hypertension, even in those without diabetes and central or general obesity. SN - 1476-5527 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21776016/Triglycerides_and_triglycerides_to_high_density_lipoprotein_cholesterol_ratio_are_strong_predictors_of_incident_hypertension_in_Middle_Eastern_women_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/jhh.2011.70 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -