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The relationship between self-reported oral health, self-regulation, proactive coping, procrastination and proactive attitude.
Community Dent Health. 2011 Jun; 28(2):170-3.CD

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

This cross-sectional study investigated the relationship between self-regulation, proactive coping, procrastination and proactive attitude, perceived oral health and self-reported oral-health behaviours.

METHODS

The study sample consisted of 198 first year medical students. The questionnaire included information about socio-demographic factors, behavioural variables, self-reported oral health status, proactive coping (proactive coping subscale of the Proactive Coping Inventory), procrastination (Procrastination Scale) and proactive attitude (Proactive Attitude Scale).

RESULTS

Significant differences were found on self-regulation, proactive coping, procrastination and proactive attitude scales between participants who rated their gingival condition as very good/excellent and those who evaluated it as being poor, very poor or normal (p < 0.05). Results revealed significant differences in procrastination level among individuals who never visit their dentist and those who visit their dentist for check-up or for tooth cleaning and scaling (p = 0.001) or when treatment is needed or when in pain (p < 0.05). In multiple linear regression analyses, proactive coping was associated with toothbrushing frequency and reason for dental visiting.

CONCLUSIONS

The result suggested that procrastination and proactive coping are important determinants of perceived oral health and self-reported oral-health behaviours.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Clinical Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. alexandrina.l.dumitrescu@gmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21780358

Citation

Dumitrescu, A L., et al. "The Relationship Between Self-reported Oral Health, Self-regulation, Proactive Coping, Procrastination and Proactive Attitude." Community Dental Health, vol. 28, no. 2, 2011, pp. 170-3.
Dumitrescu AL, Dogaru BC, Dogaru CD, et al. The relationship between self-reported oral health, self-regulation, proactive coping, procrastination and proactive attitude. Community Dent Health. 2011;28(2):170-3.
Dumitrescu, A. L., Dogaru, B. C., Dogaru, C. D., & Manolescu, B. (2011). The relationship between self-reported oral health, self-regulation, proactive coping, procrastination and proactive attitude. Community Dental Health, 28(2), 170-3.
Dumitrescu AL, et al. The Relationship Between Self-reported Oral Health, Self-regulation, Proactive Coping, Procrastination and Proactive Attitude. Community Dent Health. 2011;28(2):170-3. PubMed PMID: 21780358.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The relationship between self-reported oral health, self-regulation, proactive coping, procrastination and proactive attitude. AU - Dumitrescu,A L, AU - Dogaru,B C, AU - Dogaru,C D, AU - Manolescu,B, PY - 2011/7/26/entrez PY - 2011/7/26/pubmed PY - 2011/9/29/medline SP - 170 EP - 3 JF - Community dental health JO - Community Dent Health VL - 28 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: This cross-sectional study investigated the relationship between self-regulation, proactive coping, procrastination and proactive attitude, perceived oral health and self-reported oral-health behaviours. METHODS: The study sample consisted of 198 first year medical students. The questionnaire included information about socio-demographic factors, behavioural variables, self-reported oral health status, proactive coping (proactive coping subscale of the Proactive Coping Inventory), procrastination (Procrastination Scale) and proactive attitude (Proactive Attitude Scale). RESULTS: Significant differences were found on self-regulation, proactive coping, procrastination and proactive attitude scales between participants who rated their gingival condition as very good/excellent and those who evaluated it as being poor, very poor or normal (p < 0.05). Results revealed significant differences in procrastination level among individuals who never visit their dentist and those who visit their dentist for check-up or for tooth cleaning and scaling (p = 0.001) or when treatment is needed or when in pain (p < 0.05). In multiple linear regression analyses, proactive coping was associated with toothbrushing frequency and reason for dental visiting. CONCLUSIONS: The result suggested that procrastination and proactive coping are important determinants of perceived oral health and self-reported oral-health behaviours. SN - 0265-539X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21780358/The_relationship_between_self_reported_oral_health_self_regulation_proactive_coping_procrastination_and_proactive_attitude_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/5397 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -