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Effect of transitioning from extended-release methylphenidate onto osmotic, controlled-release methylphenidate in children/adolescents with ADHD: results of a 3-month non-interventional study.
Curr Med Res Opin. 2011; 27 Suppl 2:35-44.CM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

To explore the clinical outcomes of children/adolescents with ADHD who transitioned from extended-release methylphenidate (ER MPH, Medikinet Retard) to osmotic release oral system (OROS) MPH (Concerta). Medikinet Retard is a registered trade name of Medice, Bad Iserlohn, Germany. Concerta is a registered trade name of Janssen-Cilag GmbH, Neuss, Germany.

METHODS

This prospective, non-interventional study included patients aged 6 to 18 years with a confirmed diagnosis of ADHD who experienced insufficient clinical response and/or poor tolerability on ER MPH. Patients transitioned onto OROS MPH and were followed for 12 weeks. Symptoms, functional outcome, health-related quality of life, safety and tolerability were assessed.

RESULTS

180 patients were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. The mean ER MPH dose before switching was 28.2 mg/day; mean OROS MPH starting dose was 38.1 mg/day, increasing to 41.2 mg/day at the final visit. Mean treatment duration was 79.49 ± 24.22 days (median 85; range 7-136). Several symptomatic and functional outcomes under OROS MPH treatment changed from baseline and included the Conners' Parent Rating Scale (CPRS; -11.7 ± 11.3; p < 0.0001), C-GAS (12.3 ± 15.2; p < 0.0001) and ILC-LQ0-28 (parents' rating 2.9 ± 4.3 and patients' rating 2.8 ± 3.8; both p < 0.0001). Improvements in social interactions, playing with other children, doing household chores, or school homework, going to bed, and behavior towards visitors/at visits were noted (p < 0.0001). Approximately 40% of patients reported better sleep quality and appetite (p < 0.0001), and 72.8% expressed satisfaction with OROS MPH therapy compared to previous ER MPH. OROS MPH was well tolerated; the most common AEs after switching, with an incidence >2% and possibly related to therapy, were involuntary muscle contractions (tics; 8.9%), insomnia (7.2%) and anorexia (5.0%). No relevant changes in body weight or vital signs were observed. Three patients reported four serious AEs, but none were considered related to OROS MPH. Limitations included those associated with the uncontrolled, open-label design, possible inclusion bias and non-validation of the CPRS in a German population.

CONCLUSIONS

Transitioning onto OROS MPH improved functionality, symptom control and decreased burden of disease in patients with ADHD who had insufficient response to, and/or poor tolerability of ER MPH. Similarly, care givers benefited from patients' treatment and reported significant reduction in their burden of disease and improvement of their quality of life upon the child's transition onto OROS MPH.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Private Practice, Child and Adolescent Medicine, Hagen, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21787126

Citation

Wolff, Christian, et al. "Effect of Transitioning From Extended-release Methylphenidate Onto Osmotic, Controlled-release Methylphenidate in Children/adolescents With ADHD: Results of a 3-month Non-interventional Study." Current Medical Research and Opinion, vol. 27 Suppl 2, 2011, pp. 35-44.
Wolff C, Alfred A, Lindermüller A, et al. Effect of transitioning from extended-release methylphenidate onto osmotic, controlled-release methylphenidate in children/adolescents with ADHD: results of a 3-month non-interventional study. Curr Med Res Opin. 2011;27 Suppl 2:35-44.
Wolff, C., Alfred, A., Lindermüller, A., Rettig, K., Mattejat, F., Gerwe, M., Slawik, L., & Schäuble, B. (2011). Effect of transitioning from extended-release methylphenidate onto osmotic, controlled-release methylphenidate in children/adolescents with ADHD: results of a 3-month non-interventional study. Current Medical Research and Opinion, 27 Suppl 2, 35-44. https://doi.org/10.1185/03007995.2011.601733
Wolff C, et al. Effect of Transitioning From Extended-release Methylphenidate Onto Osmotic, Controlled-release Methylphenidate in Children/adolescents With ADHD: Results of a 3-month Non-interventional Study. Curr Med Res Opin. 2011;27 Suppl 2:35-44. PubMed PMID: 21787126.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of transitioning from extended-release methylphenidate onto osmotic, controlled-release methylphenidate in children/adolescents with ADHD: results of a 3-month non-interventional study. AU - Wolff,Christian, AU - Alfred,Adam, AU - Lindermüller,Anton, AU - Rettig,Klaus, AU - Mattejat,Fritz, AU - Gerwe,Martin, AU - Slawik,Lara, AU - Schäuble,Barbara, Y1 - 2011/07/25/ PY - 2011/10/7/entrez PY - 2011/10/19/pubmed PY - 2012/3/13/medline SP - 35 EP - 44 JF - Current medical research and opinion JO - Curr Med Res Opin VL - 27 Suppl 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: To explore the clinical outcomes of children/adolescents with ADHD who transitioned from extended-release methylphenidate (ER MPH, Medikinet Retard) to osmotic release oral system (OROS) MPH (Concerta). Medikinet Retard is a registered trade name of Medice, Bad Iserlohn, Germany. Concerta is a registered trade name of Janssen-Cilag GmbH, Neuss, Germany. METHODS: This prospective, non-interventional study included patients aged 6 to 18 years with a confirmed diagnosis of ADHD who experienced insufficient clinical response and/or poor tolerability on ER MPH. Patients transitioned onto OROS MPH and were followed for 12 weeks. Symptoms, functional outcome, health-related quality of life, safety and tolerability were assessed. RESULTS: 180 patients were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. The mean ER MPH dose before switching was 28.2 mg/day; mean OROS MPH starting dose was 38.1 mg/day, increasing to 41.2 mg/day at the final visit. Mean treatment duration was 79.49 ± 24.22 days (median 85; range 7-136). Several symptomatic and functional outcomes under OROS MPH treatment changed from baseline and included the Conners' Parent Rating Scale (CPRS; -11.7 ± 11.3; p < 0.0001), C-GAS (12.3 ± 15.2; p < 0.0001) and ILC-LQ0-28 (parents' rating 2.9 ± 4.3 and patients' rating 2.8 ± 3.8; both p < 0.0001). Improvements in social interactions, playing with other children, doing household chores, or school homework, going to bed, and behavior towards visitors/at visits were noted (p < 0.0001). Approximately 40% of patients reported better sleep quality and appetite (p < 0.0001), and 72.8% expressed satisfaction with OROS MPH therapy compared to previous ER MPH. OROS MPH was well tolerated; the most common AEs after switching, with an incidence >2% and possibly related to therapy, were involuntary muscle contractions (tics; 8.9%), insomnia (7.2%) and anorexia (5.0%). No relevant changes in body weight or vital signs were observed. Three patients reported four serious AEs, but none were considered related to OROS MPH. Limitations included those associated with the uncontrolled, open-label design, possible inclusion bias and non-validation of the CPRS in a German population. CONCLUSIONS: Transitioning onto OROS MPH improved functionality, symptom control and decreased burden of disease in patients with ADHD who had insufficient response to, and/or poor tolerability of ER MPH. Similarly, care givers benefited from patients' treatment and reported significant reduction in their burden of disease and improvement of their quality of life upon the child's transition onto OROS MPH. SN - 1473-4877 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21787126/Effect_of_transitioning_from_extended_release_methylphenidate_onto_osmotic_controlled_release_methylphenidate_in_children/adolescents_with_ADHD:_results_of_a_3_month_non_interventional_study_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1185/03007995.2011.601733 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -