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Forensic evidence collection and DNA identification in acute child sexual assault.
Pediatrics. 2011 Aug; 128(2):227-32.Ped

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe forensic evidence findings and reevaluate previous recommendations with respect to timing of evidence collection in acute child sexual assault and to identify factors associated with yield of DNA.

METHODS

This was a retrospective review of medical and legal records of patients aged 0 to 20 years who required forensic evidence collection.

RESULTS

Ninety-seven of 388 (25%) processed evidence-collection kits were positive and 63 (65%) of them produced identifiable DNA. There were 20 positive samples obtained from children younger than 10 years; 17 of these samples were obtained from children seen within 24 hours of the assault. Three children had positive body samples beyond 24 hours after the assault, including 1 child positive for salivary amylase in the underwear and on the thighs 54 hours after the assault. DNA was found in 11 children aged younger than 10 years, including the child seen 54 hours after the assault. Collection of evidence within 24 hours of the assault was identified as an independent predictor of DNA detection.

CONCLUSIONS

Identifiable DNA was collected from a child's body despite cases in which: evidence collection was performed >24 hours beyond the assault; the child had a normal/nonacute anogenital examination; there was no reported history of ejaculation; and the victim had bathed and/or changed clothes before evidence collection. Failure to conduct evidence collection on prepubertal children beyond 24 hours after the assault will result in rare missed opportunities to identify forensic evidence, including identification of DNA.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Family Violence Coalition at Nationwide Children's, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, USA. jonathan.thackeray@nationwidechildrens.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21788217

Citation

Thackeray, Jonathan D., et al. "Forensic Evidence Collection and DNA Identification in Acute Child Sexual Assault." Pediatrics, vol. 128, no. 2, 2011, pp. 227-32.
Thackeray JD, Hornor G, Benzinger EA, et al. Forensic evidence collection and DNA identification in acute child sexual assault. Pediatrics. 2011;128(2):227-32.
Thackeray, J. D., Hornor, G., Benzinger, E. A., & Scribano, P. V. (2011). Forensic evidence collection and DNA identification in acute child sexual assault. Pediatrics, 128(2), 227-32. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2010-3498
Thackeray JD, et al. Forensic Evidence Collection and DNA Identification in Acute Child Sexual Assault. Pediatrics. 2011;128(2):227-32. PubMed PMID: 21788217.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Forensic evidence collection and DNA identification in acute child sexual assault. AU - Thackeray,Jonathan D, AU - Hornor,Gail, AU - Benzinger,Elizabeth A, AU - Scribano,Philip V, Y1 - 2011/07/25/ PY - 2011/7/27/entrez PY - 2011/7/27/pubmed PY - 2011/10/14/medline SP - 227 EP - 32 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 128 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To describe forensic evidence findings and reevaluate previous recommendations with respect to timing of evidence collection in acute child sexual assault and to identify factors associated with yield of DNA. METHODS: This was a retrospective review of medical and legal records of patients aged 0 to 20 years who required forensic evidence collection. RESULTS: Ninety-seven of 388 (25%) processed evidence-collection kits were positive and 63 (65%) of them produced identifiable DNA. There were 20 positive samples obtained from children younger than 10 years; 17 of these samples were obtained from children seen within 24 hours of the assault. Three children had positive body samples beyond 24 hours after the assault, including 1 child positive for salivary amylase in the underwear and on the thighs 54 hours after the assault. DNA was found in 11 children aged younger than 10 years, including the child seen 54 hours after the assault. Collection of evidence within 24 hours of the assault was identified as an independent predictor of DNA detection. CONCLUSIONS: Identifiable DNA was collected from a child's body despite cases in which: evidence collection was performed >24 hours beyond the assault; the child had a normal/nonacute anogenital examination; there was no reported history of ejaculation; and the victim had bathed and/or changed clothes before evidence collection. Failure to conduct evidence collection on prepubertal children beyond 24 hours after the assault will result in rare missed opportunities to identify forensic evidence, including identification of DNA. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21788217/Forensic_evidence_collection_and_DNA_identification_in_acute_child_sexual_assault_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=21788217 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -