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Travel-associated zoonotic bacterial diseases.
Curr Opin Infect Dis. 2011 Oct; 24(5):457-63.CO

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW

Bacterial zoonoses are increasingly described in association with travel. Some bacterial zoonoses constitute important causes of post-travel illness. We focus on leptospirosis and rickettsiosis - the most common travel-associated bacterial zoonoses.

RECENT FINDINGS

Leptospirosis is regarded to be the most common zoonotic disease worldwide. In industrialized countries recreational exposures, both domestic and overseas, are increasingly becoming a major source of infection. Asymptomatic infection is rare among travelers. Rickettsial diseases account for approximately 1.5-3.5% of febrile travelers. In several series of travel-related rickettsioses, the most common travel-related rickettsial disease is Rickettsia africae. Other rickettsioses including Q fever, scrub typhus and murine typhus are considered rare among travelers. Whereas timely diagnosis of both diseases is still based on exposure history, antigen detection tools to aid the diagnosis during the acute illness are under research and far from being available. Due to these constrains, currently, the true incidence of both diseases is probably underestimated.

SUMMARY

Both leptospirosis and spotted fever may be rapidly fatal. Empiric doxycycline in severely ill febrile travelers should be considered. There is an urgent need for widely available antigen detection diagnostic tools to improve the detection of leptospirosis and rickettsial infections during the acute illness.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Geographic Medicine and Internal Medicine C, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21788890

Citation

Leshem, Eyal, et al. "Travel-associated Zoonotic Bacterial Diseases." Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases, vol. 24, no. 5, 2011, pp. 457-63.
Leshem E, Meltzer E, Schwartz E. Travel-associated zoonotic bacterial diseases. Curr Opin Infect Dis. 2011;24(5):457-63.
Leshem, E., Meltzer, E., & Schwartz, E. (2011). Travel-associated zoonotic bacterial diseases. Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases, 24(5), 457-63. https://doi.org/10.1097/QCO.0b013e32834a1bd2
Leshem E, Meltzer E, Schwartz E. Travel-associated Zoonotic Bacterial Diseases. Curr Opin Infect Dis. 2011;24(5):457-63. PubMed PMID: 21788890.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Travel-associated zoonotic bacterial diseases. AU - Leshem,Eyal, AU - Meltzer,Eyal, AU - Schwartz,Eli, PY - 2011/7/27/entrez PY - 2011/7/27/pubmed PY - 2011/12/30/medline SP - 457 EP - 63 JF - Current opinion in infectious diseases JO - Curr. Opin. Infect. Dis. VL - 24 IS - 5 N2 - PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Bacterial zoonoses are increasingly described in association with travel. Some bacterial zoonoses constitute important causes of post-travel illness. We focus on leptospirosis and rickettsiosis - the most common travel-associated bacterial zoonoses. RECENT FINDINGS: Leptospirosis is regarded to be the most common zoonotic disease worldwide. In industrialized countries recreational exposures, both domestic and overseas, are increasingly becoming a major source of infection. Asymptomatic infection is rare among travelers. Rickettsial diseases account for approximately 1.5-3.5% of febrile travelers. In several series of travel-related rickettsioses, the most common travel-related rickettsial disease is Rickettsia africae. Other rickettsioses including Q fever, scrub typhus and murine typhus are considered rare among travelers. Whereas timely diagnosis of both diseases is still based on exposure history, antigen detection tools to aid the diagnosis during the acute illness are under research and far from being available. Due to these constrains, currently, the true incidence of both diseases is probably underestimated. SUMMARY: Both leptospirosis and spotted fever may be rapidly fatal. Empiric doxycycline in severely ill febrile travelers should be considered. There is an urgent need for widely available antigen detection diagnostic tools to improve the detection of leptospirosis and rickettsial infections during the acute illness. SN - 1473-6527 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21788890/full_citation L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/QCO.0b013e32834a1bd2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -