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New generation typhoid vaccines: an effective preventive strategy to control typhoid fever in developing countries.
Hum Vaccin. 2011 Aug; 7(8):883-5.HV

Abstract

Typhoid fever is a serious systemic infection, caused by the enteric pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, a highly virulent and invasive enteric bacterium. This disease occurs in all parts of world where water supplies and sanitation are substandard. These pathogens then travel to food, drinks and water through house-flies and other vectors. Globally, an estimated 12-33 million cases of enteric fever occur with 216,00-600,000 deaths per year, almost exclusively in the developing countries. Health surveys conducted by the Health Ministry of India in the community development areas indicated a morbidity rate varying from 102-2219/100,000 population in different parts of the country. A limited study in an urban slum showed 1% of children up to 17 years of age suffer from typhoid fever annually. The continued high burden of typhoid fever and the alarming spread of antibiotic resistant strains led the World Health Organization (WHO), almost ten years ago, to recommend immunization using the two new-generation vaccines in school- aged children in areas where typhoid fever posed a significant problem and where antibiotic resistant strains were prevalent. Morbidity and mortality due to high incidence of typhoid fever favors the introduction of typhoid vaccine in routine immunization in India. This vaccine should be given at the age of 2 years with Vi antigen vaccine and at least one more dose be given at 5 years of age.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Community Medicine, Pt. B.D. Sharma PGIMS, Rohtak, Haryana, India. dr.rameshverma@yahoo.co.inNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21791973

Citation

Verma, Ramesh, et al. "New Generation Typhoid Vaccines: an Effective Preventive Strategy to Control Typhoid Fever in Developing Countries." Human Vaccines, vol. 7, no. 8, 2011, pp. 883-5.
Verma R, Bairwa M, Chawla S, et al. New generation typhoid vaccines: an effective preventive strategy to control typhoid fever in developing countries. Hum Vaccin. 2011;7(8):883-5.
Verma, R., Bairwa, M., Chawla, S., Prinja, S., & Rajput, M. (2011). New generation typhoid vaccines: an effective preventive strategy to control typhoid fever in developing countries. Human Vaccines, 7(8), 883-5. https://doi.org/10.4161/hv.7.8.16282
Verma R, et al. New Generation Typhoid Vaccines: an Effective Preventive Strategy to Control Typhoid Fever in Developing Countries. Hum Vaccin. 2011;7(8):883-5. PubMed PMID: 21791973.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - New generation typhoid vaccines: an effective preventive strategy to control typhoid fever in developing countries. AU - Verma,Ramesh, AU - Bairwa,Mohan, AU - Chawla,Suraj, AU - Prinja,Shankar, AU - Rajput,Meena, Y1 - 2011/08/01/ PY - 2011/7/28/entrez PY - 2011/7/28/pubmed PY - 2012/4/3/medline SP - 883 EP - 5 JF - Human vaccines JO - Hum Vaccin VL - 7 IS - 8 N2 - Typhoid fever is a serious systemic infection, caused by the enteric pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, a highly virulent and invasive enteric bacterium. This disease occurs in all parts of world where water supplies and sanitation are substandard. These pathogens then travel to food, drinks and water through house-flies and other vectors. Globally, an estimated 12-33 million cases of enteric fever occur with 216,00-600,000 deaths per year, almost exclusively in the developing countries. Health surveys conducted by the Health Ministry of India in the community development areas indicated a morbidity rate varying from 102-2219/100,000 population in different parts of the country. A limited study in an urban slum showed 1% of children up to 17 years of age suffer from typhoid fever annually. The continued high burden of typhoid fever and the alarming spread of antibiotic resistant strains led the World Health Organization (WHO), almost ten years ago, to recommend immunization using the two new-generation vaccines in school- aged children in areas where typhoid fever posed a significant problem and where antibiotic resistant strains were prevalent. Morbidity and mortality due to high incidence of typhoid fever favors the introduction of typhoid vaccine in routine immunization in India. This vaccine should be given at the age of 2 years with Vi antigen vaccine and at least one more dose be given at 5 years of age. SN - 1554-8619 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21791973/New_generation_typhoid_vaccines:_an_effective_preventive_strategy_to_control_typhoid_fever_in_developing_countries_ L2 - https://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/7276 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -