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Seasonal influenza vaccination predicts pandemic H1N1 vaccination uptake among healthcare workers in three countries.
Vaccine. 2011 Oct 06; 29(43):7364-9.V

Abstract

The aim of this study was to identify the common barriers and facilitators for acceptance of pandemic influenza vaccination across different countries. This study utilized a standardized, anonymous, self-completed questionnaire-based survey recording the demographics and professional practice, previous experience and perceived risk and severity of influenza, infection control practices, information of H1N1 vaccination, acceptance of the H1N1 vaccination and reasons of their choices and opinions on mandatory vaccination. Hospital-based doctors, nurses and allied healthcare workers in Hong Kong (HK), Singapore (SG) and Leicester, United Kingdom (UK) were recruited. A total of 6318 (HK: 5743, SG: 300, UK: 275) questionnaires were distributed, with response rates of 27.1% (HK), 94.7% (SG) and 94.5% (UK). The uptake rates for monovalent 2009 pandemic H1N1 vaccine were 13.5% (HK), 36.2% (SG) and 41.3% (UK). The single common factor associated with vaccine acceptance across all sites was having seasonal influenza vaccination in 2009. In UK and HK, overestimation of side effect reduced vaccination acceptance; and fear of side effect was a significant barrier in all sites. In HK, healthcare workers with more patient contact were more reluctant to accept vaccination. Drivers for vaccination in UK and HK were concern about catching the infection and following advice from health authority. Only a small proportion of respondents agreed with mandatory pandemic influenza vaccination (HK: 25% and UK: 42%), except in Singapore where 75.3% were in agreement. Few respondents (<5%) chose scientific publications as their primary source of information, but this group was more likely to receive vaccination. The acceptance of pandemic vaccine among healthcare workers was poor (13-41% of respondents). Breaking barriers to accept seasonal influenza vaccination should be part of the influenza pandemic preparedness plan. Mandatory vaccination even during pandemic is likely to arouse substantial discontent.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Public Health and Primary Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21807048

Citation

Chor, Josette S Y., et al. "Seasonal Influenza Vaccination Predicts Pandemic H1N1 Vaccination Uptake Among Healthcare Workers in Three Countries." Vaccine, vol. 29, no. 43, 2011, pp. 7364-9.
Chor JS, Pada SK, Stephenson I, et al. Seasonal influenza vaccination predicts pandemic H1N1 vaccination uptake among healthcare workers in three countries. Vaccine. 2011;29(43):7364-9.
Chor, J. S., Pada, S. K., Stephenson, I., Goggins, W. B., Tambyah, P. A., Clarke, T. W., Medina, M., Lee, N., Leung, T. F., Ngai, K. L., Law, S. K., Rainer, T. H., Griffiths, S., & Chan, P. K. (2011). Seasonal influenza vaccination predicts pandemic H1N1 vaccination uptake among healthcare workers in three countries. Vaccine, 29(43), 7364-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2011.07.079
Chor JS, et al. Seasonal Influenza Vaccination Predicts Pandemic H1N1 Vaccination Uptake Among Healthcare Workers in Three Countries. Vaccine. 2011 Oct 6;29(43):7364-9. PubMed PMID: 21807048.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Seasonal influenza vaccination predicts pandemic H1N1 vaccination uptake among healthcare workers in three countries. AU - Chor,Josette S Y, AU - Pada,Surinder K, AU - Stephenson,Iain, AU - Goggins,William B, AU - Tambyah,Paul A, AU - Clarke,Tristan William, AU - Medina,Mariejo, AU - Lee,Nelson, AU - Leung,Ting Fun, AU - Ngai,Karry L K, AU - Law,Shu Kei, AU - Rainer,Timothy H, AU - Griffiths,Sian, AU - Chan,Paul K S, Y1 - 2011/07/30/ PY - 2011/03/29/received PY - 2011/07/06/revised PY - 2011/07/18/accepted PY - 2011/8/3/entrez PY - 2011/8/3/pubmed PY - 2012/3/30/medline SP - 7364 EP - 9 JF - Vaccine JO - Vaccine VL - 29 IS - 43 N2 - The aim of this study was to identify the common barriers and facilitators for acceptance of pandemic influenza vaccination across different countries. This study utilized a standardized, anonymous, self-completed questionnaire-based survey recording the demographics and professional practice, previous experience and perceived risk and severity of influenza, infection control practices, information of H1N1 vaccination, acceptance of the H1N1 vaccination and reasons of their choices and opinions on mandatory vaccination. Hospital-based doctors, nurses and allied healthcare workers in Hong Kong (HK), Singapore (SG) and Leicester, United Kingdom (UK) were recruited. A total of 6318 (HK: 5743, SG: 300, UK: 275) questionnaires were distributed, with response rates of 27.1% (HK), 94.7% (SG) and 94.5% (UK). The uptake rates for monovalent 2009 pandemic H1N1 vaccine were 13.5% (HK), 36.2% (SG) and 41.3% (UK). The single common factor associated with vaccine acceptance across all sites was having seasonal influenza vaccination in 2009. In UK and HK, overestimation of side effect reduced vaccination acceptance; and fear of side effect was a significant barrier in all sites. In HK, healthcare workers with more patient contact were more reluctant to accept vaccination. Drivers for vaccination in UK and HK were concern about catching the infection and following advice from health authority. Only a small proportion of respondents agreed with mandatory pandemic influenza vaccination (HK: 25% and UK: 42%), except in Singapore where 75.3% were in agreement. Few respondents (<5%) chose scientific publications as their primary source of information, but this group was more likely to receive vaccination. The acceptance of pandemic vaccine among healthcare workers was poor (13-41% of respondents). Breaking barriers to accept seasonal influenza vaccination should be part of the influenza pandemic preparedness plan. Mandatory vaccination even during pandemic is likely to arouse substantial discontent. SN - 1873-2518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21807048/Seasonal_influenza_vaccination_predicts_pandemic_H1N1_vaccination_uptake_among_healthcare_workers_in_three_countries_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0264-410X(11)01129-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -