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Factors that contribute to the improvement in maternal parenting after separation from a violent husband or partner.
J Interpers Violence. 2012 Jan; 27(2):380-95.JI

Abstract

The authors test the hypothesis that separation from a violent husband or partner improves maternal parenting in Japan and examine how childhood abuse history (CAH), experience of domestic violence (DV), mental health problems, husband or partner's child maltreatment, and other demographic factors affect maternal parenting after such separation. A self-administered questionnaire survey is conducted for mothers (n = 304) and their children (n = 498) staying in 83 mother-child homes in Japan to assess the mothers' CAH, DV experiences, current mental health problems, and exposure to a husband or partner's child maltreatment. The authors also assess maternal poor parenting (physical and psychological abuse, neglect, no playing, and no praise) before and after admission into the mother-child homes. The total poor parenting score (specifically for neglect, no playing, and no praise) significantly reduces after separation from a violent husband or partner (p = .001, paired t test). However, scores for psychological abuse significantly increase after admission (p < .001, paired t test). CAH, DV, and mental health problems are not associated with a reduced total poor parenting score after admission. Husband or partner's child maltreatment is independently significantly associated with a reduced maternal poor parenting score: A 10% increase in such maltreatment is associated with a 5% reduction in the poor parenting score after separation. Marital status also contributes to the score reduction: The reduction is less in married or divorced mothers than in those who did not marry the partner. Mother-child homes might be useful for improving maternal parenting. Further study is needed to elucidate the mechanism of the impact of separation from a violent husband or partner on maternal parenting.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Social Medicine, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo, Japan. tfujiwara@nch.go.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21810793

Citation

Fujiwara, Takeo, et al. "Factors That Contribute to the Improvement in Maternal Parenting After Separation From a Violent Husband or Partner." Journal of Interpersonal Violence, vol. 27, no. 2, 2012, pp. 380-95.
Fujiwara T, Okuyama M, Izumi M. Factors that contribute to the improvement in maternal parenting after separation from a violent husband or partner. J Interpers Violence. 2012;27(2):380-95.
Fujiwara, T., Okuyama, M., & Izumi, M. (2012). Factors that contribute to the improvement in maternal parenting after separation from a violent husband or partner. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 27(2), 380-95. https://doi.org/10.1177/0886260511416464
Fujiwara T, Okuyama M, Izumi M. Factors That Contribute to the Improvement in Maternal Parenting After Separation From a Violent Husband or Partner. J Interpers Violence. 2012;27(2):380-95. PubMed PMID: 21810793.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Factors that contribute to the improvement in maternal parenting after separation from a violent husband or partner. AU - Fujiwara,Takeo, AU - Okuyama,Makiko, AU - Izumi,Mayuko, Y1 - 2011/08/01/ PY - 2011/8/4/entrez PY - 2011/8/4/pubmed PY - 2012/6/26/medline SP - 380 EP - 95 JF - Journal of interpersonal violence JO - J Interpers Violence VL - 27 IS - 2 N2 - The authors test the hypothesis that separation from a violent husband or partner improves maternal parenting in Japan and examine how childhood abuse history (CAH), experience of domestic violence (DV), mental health problems, husband or partner's child maltreatment, and other demographic factors affect maternal parenting after such separation. A self-administered questionnaire survey is conducted for mothers (n = 304) and their children (n = 498) staying in 83 mother-child homes in Japan to assess the mothers' CAH, DV experiences, current mental health problems, and exposure to a husband or partner's child maltreatment. The authors also assess maternal poor parenting (physical and psychological abuse, neglect, no playing, and no praise) before and after admission into the mother-child homes. The total poor parenting score (specifically for neglect, no playing, and no praise) significantly reduces after separation from a violent husband or partner (p = .001, paired t test). However, scores for psychological abuse significantly increase after admission (p < .001, paired t test). CAH, DV, and mental health problems are not associated with a reduced total poor parenting score after admission. Husband or partner's child maltreatment is independently significantly associated with a reduced maternal poor parenting score: A 10% increase in such maltreatment is associated with a 5% reduction in the poor parenting score after separation. Marital status also contributes to the score reduction: The reduction is less in married or divorced mothers than in those who did not marry the partner. Mother-child homes might be useful for improving maternal parenting. Further study is needed to elucidate the mechanism of the impact of separation from a violent husband or partner on maternal parenting. SN - 1552-6518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21810793/Factors_that_contribute_to_the_improvement_in_maternal_parenting_after_separation_from_a_violent_husband_or_partner_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0886260511416464?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -