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Effect of short-term low- and high-fat diets on low-density lipoprotein particle size in normolipidemic subjects.
Metabolism. 2012 Jan; 61(1):76-83.M

Abstract

High-fat, low-carbohydrate diets have been shown to raise plasma cholesterol levels, an effect associated with the formation of large low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles. However, the impact of dietary intervention on time-course changes in LDL particle size has not been investigated. To test whether a short-term dietary intervention affects LDL particle size, we conducted a randomized, double-blind, crossover study using an intensive dietary modification in 12 nonobese healthy men with normal plasma lipid profile. Participants were subjected to 2 isocaloric 3-day diets: high-fat diet (37% energy from fat and 50% from carbohydrates) and low-fat diet (25% energy from fat and 62% from carbohydrates). Plasma lipid levels and LDL particle size were assessed on fasting blood samples after 3 days of feeding on each diet. The LDL particles were characterized by polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis. Compared with the low-fat diet, plasma cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were significantly increased (4.45 vs 4.78 mmol/L, P = .04; 2.48 vs 2.90 mmol/L, P = .005; and 1.29 vs 1.41 mmol/L, P = .005, respectively) following the 3-day high-fat diet. Plasma triglycerides and fasting apolipoprotein B-48 levels were significantly decreased after the high-fat diet compared with the low-fat diet (1.48 vs 1.01 mmol/L, P = .0003 and 9.6 vs 5.5 mg/L, P = .008, respectively). The high-fat diet was also associated with a significant increase in LDL particle size (255.0 vs 255.9 Å;P = .01) and a significant decrease in the proportion of small LDL particle (<255.0 Å) (50.7% vs 44.6%, P = .01). As compared with a low-fat diet, the cholesterol-raising effect of a high-fat diet is associated with the formation of large LDL particles after only 3 days of feeding.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute on Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods, Laval University, Québec, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21816443

Citation

Guay, Valérie, et al. "Effect of Short-term Low- and High-fat Diets On Low-density Lipoprotein Particle Size in Normolipidemic Subjects." Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, vol. 61, no. 1, 2012, pp. 76-83.
Guay V, Lamarche B, Charest A, et al. Effect of short-term low- and high-fat diets on low-density lipoprotein particle size in normolipidemic subjects. Metabolism. 2012;61(1):76-83.
Guay, V., Lamarche, B., Charest, A., Tremblay, A. J., & Couture, P. (2012). Effect of short-term low- and high-fat diets on low-density lipoprotein particle size in normolipidemic subjects. Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, 61(1), 76-83. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.metabol.2011.06.002
Guay V, et al. Effect of Short-term Low- and High-fat Diets On Low-density Lipoprotein Particle Size in Normolipidemic Subjects. Metabolism. 2012;61(1):76-83. PubMed PMID: 21816443.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of short-term low- and high-fat diets on low-density lipoprotein particle size in normolipidemic subjects. AU - Guay,Valérie, AU - Lamarche,Benoît, AU - Charest,Amélie, AU - Tremblay,André J, AU - Couture,Patrick, Y1 - 2011/08/03/ PY - 2011/01/11/received PY - 2011/05/20/revised PY - 2011/06/05/accepted PY - 2011/8/6/entrez PY - 2011/8/6/pubmed PY - 2012/4/6/medline SP - 76 EP - 83 JF - Metabolism: clinical and experimental JO - Metabolism VL - 61 IS - 1 N2 - High-fat, low-carbohydrate diets have been shown to raise plasma cholesterol levels, an effect associated with the formation of large low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles. However, the impact of dietary intervention on time-course changes in LDL particle size has not been investigated. To test whether a short-term dietary intervention affects LDL particle size, we conducted a randomized, double-blind, crossover study using an intensive dietary modification in 12 nonobese healthy men with normal plasma lipid profile. Participants were subjected to 2 isocaloric 3-day diets: high-fat diet (37% energy from fat and 50% from carbohydrates) and low-fat diet (25% energy from fat and 62% from carbohydrates). Plasma lipid levels and LDL particle size were assessed on fasting blood samples after 3 days of feeding on each diet. The LDL particles were characterized by polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis. Compared with the low-fat diet, plasma cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were significantly increased (4.45 vs 4.78 mmol/L, P = .04; 2.48 vs 2.90 mmol/L, P = .005; and 1.29 vs 1.41 mmol/L, P = .005, respectively) following the 3-day high-fat diet. Plasma triglycerides and fasting apolipoprotein B-48 levels were significantly decreased after the high-fat diet compared with the low-fat diet (1.48 vs 1.01 mmol/L, P = .0003 and 9.6 vs 5.5 mg/L, P = .008, respectively). The high-fat diet was also associated with a significant increase in LDL particle size (255.0 vs 255.9 Å;P = .01) and a significant decrease in the proportion of small LDL particle (<255.0 Å) (50.7% vs 44.6%, P = .01). As compared with a low-fat diet, the cholesterol-raising effect of a high-fat diet is associated with the formation of large LDL particles after only 3 days of feeding. SN - 1532-8600 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21816443/Effect_of_short_term_low__and_high_fat_diets_on_low_density_lipoprotein_particle_size_in_normolipidemic_subjects_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0026-0495(11)00176-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -