Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Prevalence and features of panic disorder and comparison to posttraumatic stress disorder in VA primary care.
Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2011 Sep-Oct; 33(5):482-8.GH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Although panic disorder (PD) is a highly prevalent condition in both community and community primary care settings, little is known about PD in veteran populations, especially in comparison to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The present study investigated prevalence, comorbidity, physical and mental health impairment, and health care utilization of veterans with PD and PTSD.

METHOD

A total of 884 veterans participated in a cross-sectional investigation in primary care clinics in four Veteran Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs). Participants completed diagnostic interviews and self-report questionnaires, and a chart review was completed to assess their VAMC health care utilization.

RESULTS

A large number of veterans (8.3%) met the diagnostic criteria for PD and reported significantly more severe physical health impairment (pain, general health), mental health impairment (emotional well-being, role limitations) and social functioning than veterans without PD. Veterans with PD also had increased health care utilization for mental health. Further, PD was highly comorbid with PTSD, with similar symptoms across all measures.

CONCLUSIONS

These findings demonstrate the high prevalence and severe impairment associated with PD in veterans and highlight the need for improved recognition, assessment and specialized treatments for PD in VAMCs and other care settings.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Mental Health Service, Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Charleston, SC 29401, USA. grosd@musc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21816481

Citation

Gros, Daniel F., et al. "Prevalence and Features of Panic Disorder and Comparison to Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in VA Primary Care." General Hospital Psychiatry, vol. 33, no. 5, 2011, pp. 482-8.
Gros DF, Frueh BC, Magruder KM. Prevalence and features of panic disorder and comparison to posttraumatic stress disorder in VA primary care. Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2011;33(5):482-8.
Gros, D. F., Frueh, B. C., & Magruder, K. M. (2011). Prevalence and features of panic disorder and comparison to posttraumatic stress disorder in VA primary care. General Hospital Psychiatry, 33(5), 482-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2011.06.005
Gros DF, Frueh BC, Magruder KM. Prevalence and Features of Panic Disorder and Comparison to Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in VA Primary Care. Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2011 Sep-Oct;33(5):482-8. PubMed PMID: 21816481.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence and features of panic disorder and comparison to posttraumatic stress disorder in VA primary care. AU - Gros,Daniel F, AU - Frueh,B Christopher, AU - Magruder,Kathryn M, Y1 - 2011/08/03/ PY - 2011/02/22/received PY - 2011/06/21/revised PY - 2011/06/21/accepted PY - 2011/8/6/entrez PY - 2011/8/6/pubmed PY - 2012/3/1/medline SP - 482 EP - 8 JF - General hospital psychiatry JO - Gen Hosp Psychiatry VL - 33 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Although panic disorder (PD) is a highly prevalent condition in both community and community primary care settings, little is known about PD in veteran populations, especially in comparison to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The present study investigated prevalence, comorbidity, physical and mental health impairment, and health care utilization of veterans with PD and PTSD. METHOD: A total of 884 veterans participated in a cross-sectional investigation in primary care clinics in four Veteran Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs). Participants completed diagnostic interviews and self-report questionnaires, and a chart review was completed to assess their VAMC health care utilization. RESULTS: A large number of veterans (8.3%) met the diagnostic criteria for PD and reported significantly more severe physical health impairment (pain, general health), mental health impairment (emotional well-being, role limitations) and social functioning than veterans without PD. Veterans with PD also had increased health care utilization for mental health. Further, PD was highly comorbid with PTSD, with similar symptoms across all measures. CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate the high prevalence and severe impairment associated with PD in veterans and highlight the need for improved recognition, assessment and specialized treatments for PD in VAMCs and other care settings. SN - 1873-7714 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21816481/Prevalence_and_features_of_panic_disorder_and_comparison_to_posttraumatic_stress_disorder_in_VA_primary_care_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0163-8343(11)00229-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -