Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Gender differences in the reciprocal relationships between parental physical aggression and children's externalizing problem behavior in China.
J Fam Psychol. 2011 Oct; 25(5):699-708.JF

Abstract

The study examines gender differences in the reciprocal relations between parental physical aggression and child externalizing problem behavior in China. Four hundred fifty-four Chinese elementary school-age children reported on three forms of their parents' physical aggression toward them (i.e., mild corporal punishment, severe corporal punishment, and physical abuse) and their externalizing problem behavior at two time points, 6 months apart. Structural equation modeling revealed that the three types of parental physical aggression predicted child externalizing problem behavior for girls but not boys, whereas child externalizing problem behavior predicted severe corporal punishment and physical abuse for boys but not girls; child externalizing problem behavior did not predict mild corporal punishment for either gender. The findings suggest that the intervention for and prevention of child externalizing problem behavior may be somewhat different for boys and girls in China.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Shandong Normal University, P. R. China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21823794

Citation

Xing, Xiaopei, et al. "Gender Differences in the Reciprocal Relationships Between Parental Physical Aggression and Children's Externalizing Problem Behavior in China." Journal of Family Psychology : JFP : Journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43), vol. 25, no. 5, 2011, pp. 699-708.
Xing X, Wang M, Zhang Q, et al. Gender differences in the reciprocal relationships between parental physical aggression and children's externalizing problem behavior in China. J Fam Psychol. 2011;25(5):699-708.
Xing, X., Wang, M., Zhang, Q., He, X., & Zhang, W. (2011). Gender differences in the reciprocal relationships between parental physical aggression and children's externalizing problem behavior in China. Journal of Family Psychology : JFP : Journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43), 25(5), 699-708. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0025015
Xing X, et al. Gender Differences in the Reciprocal Relationships Between Parental Physical Aggression and Children's Externalizing Problem Behavior in China. J Fam Psychol. 2011;25(5):699-708. PubMed PMID: 21823794.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gender differences in the reciprocal relationships between parental physical aggression and children's externalizing problem behavior in China. AU - Xing,Xiaopei, AU - Wang,Meifang, AU - Zhang,Qing, AU - He,Xiaorui, AU - Zhang,Wenxin, PY - 2011/8/10/entrez PY - 2011/8/10/pubmed PY - 2012/2/18/medline SP - 699 EP - 708 JF - Journal of family psychology : JFP : journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43) JO - J Fam Psychol VL - 25 IS - 5 N2 - The study examines gender differences in the reciprocal relations between parental physical aggression and child externalizing problem behavior in China. Four hundred fifty-four Chinese elementary school-age children reported on three forms of their parents' physical aggression toward them (i.e., mild corporal punishment, severe corporal punishment, and physical abuse) and their externalizing problem behavior at two time points, 6 months apart. Structural equation modeling revealed that the three types of parental physical aggression predicted child externalizing problem behavior for girls but not boys, whereas child externalizing problem behavior predicted severe corporal punishment and physical abuse for boys but not girls; child externalizing problem behavior did not predict mild corporal punishment for either gender. The findings suggest that the intervention for and prevention of child externalizing problem behavior may be somewhat different for boys and girls in China. SN - 1939-1293 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21823794/Gender_differences_in_the_reciprocal_relationships_between_parental_physical_aggression_and_children's_externalizing_problem_behavior_in_China_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/fam/25/5/699 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -