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Oral branched-chain amino acid granules reduce the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma and improve event-free survival in patients with liver cirrhosis.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

It has been reported that branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) supplementation can improve nutritional status and prevent liver-related complications in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. We investigated the effects of oral BCAA supplementation on the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and liver-related events in patients with compensated and decompensated cirrhosis.

METHODS

We enrolled 211 patients with cirrhosis including 152 patients with Child-Pugh A cirrhosis, but no history of HCC. Of these, 56 received oral administration of 12 g/day BCAA for ≥6 months (BCAA group), and 155 were followed-up without BCAA treatment (control group). The HCC occurrence and event-free survival rates were compared between the two groups. We used a propensity score analysis to overcome selection bias of this retrospective analysis.

RESULTS

The HCC occurrence rate was significantly lower and event-free survival rate was significantly higher in the BCAA group than in the control group. Multivariate analyses showed BCAA supplementation was significantly associated with reduced incidence of HCC (hazard ratio (HR) 0.416, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.216-0.800, p = 0.0085). BCAA supplementation also reduced the incidence of liver-related events in patients with Child-Pugh A cirrhosis, although the difference did not reach statistical significance (HR 0.585, 95% CI 0.336-1.017, p = 0.0575).

CONCLUSIONS

Oral BCAA supplementation is associated with reduced incidence of HCC in patients with cirrhosis and seems to prevent liver-related events in patients with Child-Pugh A cirrhosis.

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Authors+Show Affiliations

,

Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Sakai Hospital, Osaka, Japan.

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Source

MeSH

Administration, Oral
Amino Acids, Branched-Chain
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Hepacivirus
Humans
Incidence
Japan
Liver Cirrhosis
Liver Neoplasms
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21829025

Citation

Hayaishi, Sosuke, et al. "Oral Branched-chain Amino Acid Granules Reduce the Incidence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Improve Event-free Survival in Patients With Liver Cirrhosis." Digestive Diseases (Basel, Switzerland), vol. 29, no. 3, 2011, pp. 326-32.
Hayaishi S, Chung H, Kudo M, et al. Oral branched-chain amino acid granules reduce the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma and improve event-free survival in patients with liver cirrhosis. Dig Dis. 2011;29(3):326-32.
Hayaishi, S., Chung, H., Kudo, M., Ishikawa, E., Takita, M., Ueda, T., ... Ueshima, K. (2011). Oral branched-chain amino acid granules reduce the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma and improve event-free survival in patients with liver cirrhosis. Digestive Diseases (Basel, Switzerland), 29(3), pp. 326-32. doi:10.1159/000327571.
Hayaishi S, et al. Oral Branched-chain Amino Acid Granules Reduce the Incidence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Improve Event-free Survival in Patients With Liver Cirrhosis. Dig Dis. 2011;29(3):326-32. PubMed PMID: 21829025.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Oral branched-chain amino acid granules reduce the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma and improve event-free survival in patients with liver cirrhosis. AU - Hayaishi,Sosuke, AU - Chung,Hobyung, AU - Kudo,Masatoshi, AU - Ishikawa,Emi, AU - Takita,Masahiro, AU - Ueda,Taisuke, AU - Kitai,Satoshi, AU - Inoue,Tatsuo, AU - Yada,Norihisa, AU - Hagiwara,Satoru, AU - Minami,Yasunori, AU - Ueshima,Kazuomi, Y1 - 2011/08/09/ PY - 2011/8/11/entrez PY - 2011/8/11/pubmed PY - 2011/12/28/medline SP - 326 EP - 32 JF - Digestive diseases (Basel, Switzerland) JO - Dig Dis VL - 29 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: It has been reported that branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) supplementation can improve nutritional status and prevent liver-related complications in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. We investigated the effects of oral BCAA supplementation on the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and liver-related events in patients with compensated and decompensated cirrhosis. METHODS: We enrolled 211 patients with cirrhosis including 152 patients with Child-Pugh A cirrhosis, but no history of HCC. Of these, 56 received oral administration of 12 g/day BCAA for ≥6 months (BCAA group), and 155 were followed-up without BCAA treatment (control group). The HCC occurrence and event-free survival rates were compared between the two groups. We used a propensity score analysis to overcome selection bias of this retrospective analysis. RESULTS: The HCC occurrence rate was significantly lower and event-free survival rate was significantly higher in the BCAA group than in the control group. Multivariate analyses showed BCAA supplementation was significantly associated with reduced incidence of HCC (hazard ratio (HR) 0.416, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.216-0.800, p = 0.0085). BCAA supplementation also reduced the incidence of liver-related events in patients with Child-Pugh A cirrhosis, although the difference did not reach statistical significance (HR 0.585, 95% CI 0.336-1.017, p = 0.0575). CONCLUSIONS: Oral BCAA supplementation is associated with reduced incidence of HCC in patients with cirrhosis and seems to prevent liver-related events in patients with Child-Pugh A cirrhosis. SN - 1421-9875 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21829025/Oral_branched_chain_amino_acid_granules_reduce_the_incidence_of_hepatocellular_carcinoma_and_improve_event_free_survival_in_patients_with_liver_cirrhosis_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -