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Biogenic amines in fish, fish products and shellfish: a review.

Abstract

Fish, cephalopods and shellfish provide a healthy source of high-quality proteins, essential vitamins, minerals and polyunsaturated fatty acids. The beneficial effects of fish consumption on human health such as protection against coronary heart disease and certain cancer may be offset by fish decomposition and the formation of chemical contaminants such as biogenic amines. There are several toxicological effects of biogenic amines on humans, especially histamine. It is the causative agent of histamine or scombroid fish poisoning which is a significant public health problem. In individuals with diminished histamine detoxification, ingestion of even a low or moderate histamine- or tyramine-containing fish may lead to food intolerance. Biogenic amines such as putrescine, tyramine and cadaverine can potentiate histamine toxicity. Furthermore, dietary polyamine intake should be minimised in some cancer patients. Besides their potential toxicity, biogenic amines are used for the evaluation of hygienic quality of different marine and freshwater species. Spoilage pattern and biogenic amine formation are species specific. Histamine has been traditionally used as an indicator of the quality of histidine-rich fish (dark-muscle fish). On the other hand, putrescine and cadaverine are the most objective indicators of quality of histidine-poor fish (white-muscle fish), shellfish and fermented seafood products.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Zagreb, Croatia. prester@imi.hr

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21834642

Citation

Prester, Ljerka. "Biogenic Amines in Fish, Fish Products and Shellfish: a Review." Food Additives & Contaminants. Part A, Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure & Risk Assessment, vol. 28, no. 11, 2011, pp. 1547-60.
Prester L. Biogenic amines in fish, fish products and shellfish: a review. Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2011;28(11):1547-60.
Prester, L. (2011). Biogenic amines in fish, fish products and shellfish: a review. Food Additives & Contaminants. Part A, Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure & Risk Assessment, 28(11), 1547-60. https://doi.org/10.1080/19440049.2011.600728
Prester L. Biogenic Amines in Fish, Fish Products and Shellfish: a Review. Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2011;28(11):1547-60. PubMed PMID: 21834642.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Biogenic amines in fish, fish products and shellfish: a review. A1 - Prester,Ljerka, Y1 - 2011/08/11/ PY - 2011/8/13/entrez PY - 2011/8/13/pubmed PY - 2012/2/9/medline SP - 1547 EP - 60 JF - Food additives & contaminants. Part A, Chemistry, analysis, control, exposure & risk assessment JO - Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess VL - 28 IS - 11 N2 - Fish, cephalopods and shellfish provide a healthy source of high-quality proteins, essential vitamins, minerals and polyunsaturated fatty acids. The beneficial effects of fish consumption on human health such as protection against coronary heart disease and certain cancer may be offset by fish decomposition and the formation of chemical contaminants such as biogenic amines. There are several toxicological effects of biogenic amines on humans, especially histamine. It is the causative agent of histamine or scombroid fish poisoning which is a significant public health problem. In individuals with diminished histamine detoxification, ingestion of even a low or moderate histamine- or tyramine-containing fish may lead to food intolerance. Biogenic amines such as putrescine, tyramine and cadaverine can potentiate histamine toxicity. Furthermore, dietary polyamine intake should be minimised in some cancer patients. Besides their potential toxicity, biogenic amines are used for the evaluation of hygienic quality of different marine and freshwater species. Spoilage pattern and biogenic amine formation are species specific. Histamine has been traditionally used as an indicator of the quality of histidine-rich fish (dark-muscle fish). On the other hand, putrescine and cadaverine are the most objective indicators of quality of histidine-poor fish (white-muscle fish), shellfish and fermented seafood products. SN - 1944-0057 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21834642/Biogenic_amines_in_fish_fish_products_and_shellfish:_a_review_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19440049.2011.600728 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -