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Traffic-related air toxics and term low birth weight in Los Angeles County, California.
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Jan; 120(1):132-8.EH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Numerous studies have linked criteria air pollutants with adverse birth outcomes, but there is less information on the importance of specific emission sources, such as traffic, and air toxics.

OBJECTIVES

We used three exposure data sources to examine odds of term low birth weight (LBW) in Los Angeles, California, women when exposed to high levels of traffic-related air pollutants during pregnancy.

METHODS

We identified term births during 1 June 2004 to 30 March 2006 to women residing within 5 miles of a South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) Multiple Air Toxics Exposure Study (MATES III) monitoring station. Pregnancy period average exposures were estimated for air toxics, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), source-specific particulate matter < 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) based on a chemical mass balance model, criteria air pollutants from government monitoring data, and land use regression (LUR) model estimates of nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx). Associations between these metrics and odds of term LBW (< 2,500 g) were examined using logistic regression.

RESULTS

Odds of term LBW increased approximately 5% per interquartile range increase in entire pregnancy exposures to several correlated traffic pollutants: LUR measures of NO, NO2, and NOx, elemental carbon, and PM2.5 from diesel and gasoline combustion and paved road dust (geological PM2.5).

CONCLUSIONS

These analyses provide additional evidence of the potential impact of traffic-related air pollution on fetal growth. Particles from traffic sources should be a focus of future studies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of California-Los Angeles, 650 Charles E. Young Dr., Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. mwilhelm@ucla.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21835727

Citation

Wilhelm, Michelle, et al. "Traffic-related Air Toxics and Term Low Birth Weight in Los Angeles County, California." Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 120, no. 1, 2012, pp. 132-8.
Wilhelm M, Ghosh JK, Su J, et al. Traffic-related air toxics and term low birth weight in Los Angeles County, California. Environ Health Perspect. 2012;120(1):132-8.
Wilhelm, M., Ghosh, J. K., Su, J., Cockburn, M., Jerrett, M., & Ritz, B. (2012). Traffic-related air toxics and term low birth weight in Los Angeles County, California. Environmental Health Perspectives, 120(1), 132-8. https://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1103408
Wilhelm M, et al. Traffic-related Air Toxics and Term Low Birth Weight in Los Angeles County, California. Environ Health Perspect. 2012;120(1):132-8. PubMed PMID: 21835727.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Traffic-related air toxics and term low birth weight in Los Angeles County, California. AU - Wilhelm,Michelle, AU - Ghosh,Jo Kay, AU - Su,Jason, AU - Cockburn,Myles, AU - Jerrett,Michael, AU - Ritz,Beate, Y1 - 2011/08/11/ PY - 2011/01/05/received PY - 2011/08/11/accepted PY - 2011/8/13/entrez PY - 2011/8/13/pubmed PY - 2012/6/12/medline SP - 132 EP - 8 JF - Environmental health perspectives JO - Environ Health Perspect VL - 120 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Numerous studies have linked criteria air pollutants with adverse birth outcomes, but there is less information on the importance of specific emission sources, such as traffic, and air toxics. OBJECTIVES: We used three exposure data sources to examine odds of term low birth weight (LBW) in Los Angeles, California, women when exposed to high levels of traffic-related air pollutants during pregnancy. METHODS: We identified term births during 1 June 2004 to 30 March 2006 to women residing within 5 miles of a South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) Multiple Air Toxics Exposure Study (MATES III) monitoring station. Pregnancy period average exposures were estimated for air toxics, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), source-specific particulate matter < 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) based on a chemical mass balance model, criteria air pollutants from government monitoring data, and land use regression (LUR) model estimates of nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx). Associations between these metrics and odds of term LBW (< 2,500 g) were examined using logistic regression. RESULTS: Odds of term LBW increased approximately 5% per interquartile range increase in entire pregnancy exposures to several correlated traffic pollutants: LUR measures of NO, NO2, and NOx, elemental carbon, and PM2.5 from diesel and gasoline combustion and paved road dust (geological PM2.5). CONCLUSIONS: These analyses provide additional evidence of the potential impact of traffic-related air pollution on fetal growth. Particles from traffic sources should be a focus of future studies. SN - 1552-9924 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21835727/Traffic_related_air_toxics_and_term_low_birth_weight_in_Los_Angeles_County_California_ L2 - https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/doi/10.1289/ehp.1103408?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -