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Transplant tourism and donor-derived parasitic infections.
Transplant Proc. 2011 Jul-Aug; 43(6):2448-9.TP

Abstract

Transplant tourism, travel with the intent of receiving or donating a transplanted organ, has grown immensely in the past decade but is not without risks. Solid organ donors are potential carriers of infection and rates of infection are high in transplant recipients. Returning transplant recipients should be screened for blood-borne pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV), as well as bacteremia, urinary tract infections, and other endemic pathogens (malaria, tuberculosis, Chagas disease, and so on). Efforts should be made to optimize posttransplantation prophylaxis against infection. Although donor-derived parasitic infections are rare, rates of morbidity and mortality are high. Increases in world travel and migration will likely contribute to increases in donor-derived parasitic infection. Appropriate epidemiological screening and diagnostic testing, including blood smears, serology, and stool assays, may help reduce the risk of such transmission.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Transplant and Immunocompromised Host Infectious Diseases, Infectious Diseases Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA. ckotton@partners.org

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21839290

Citation

Kotton, C N.. "Transplant Tourism and Donor-derived Parasitic Infections." Transplantation Proceedings, vol. 43, no. 6, 2011, pp. 2448-9.
Kotton CN. Transplant tourism and donor-derived parasitic infections. Transplant Proc. 2011;43(6):2448-9.
Kotton, C. N. (2011). Transplant tourism and donor-derived parasitic infections. Transplantation Proceedings, 43(6), 2448-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.transproceed.2011.06.022
Kotton CN. Transplant Tourism and Donor-derived Parasitic Infections. Transplant Proc. 2011 Jul-Aug;43(6):2448-9. PubMed PMID: 21839290.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Transplant tourism and donor-derived parasitic infections. A1 - Kotton,C N, PY - 2011/8/16/entrez PY - 2011/8/16/pubmed PY - 2012/1/6/medline SP - 2448 EP - 9 JF - Transplantation proceedings JO - Transplant Proc VL - 43 IS - 6 N2 - Transplant tourism, travel with the intent of receiving or donating a transplanted organ, has grown immensely in the past decade but is not without risks. Solid organ donors are potential carriers of infection and rates of infection are high in transplant recipients. Returning transplant recipients should be screened for blood-borne pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV), as well as bacteremia, urinary tract infections, and other endemic pathogens (malaria, tuberculosis, Chagas disease, and so on). Efforts should be made to optimize posttransplantation prophylaxis against infection. Although donor-derived parasitic infections are rare, rates of morbidity and mortality are high. Increases in world travel and migration will likely contribute to increases in donor-derived parasitic infection. Appropriate epidemiological screening and diagnostic testing, including blood smears, serology, and stool assays, may help reduce the risk of such transmission. SN - 1873-2623 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21839290/Transplant_tourism_and_donor_derived_parasitic_infections_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0041-1345(11)00830-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -