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Uric acid and incident chronic kidney disease in a large health check-up population in Taiwan.
Nephrology (Carlton). 2011 Nov; 16(8):767-76.N

Abstract

AIM

Uric acid (UA) is strongly associated with the confirmed chronic kidney disease (CKD) risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes and metabolic syndrome (MS); however, whether higher UA is independently associated with CKD is still debatable. Other studies found that low UA level may reflect inadequate protection against oxidant-mediated stress; it is also unknown whether hypouricemia may have a harmful effect on the kidney. No studies have examined whether there is a J-shaped relationship between UA and incident CKD.

METHODS

The association between UA and incident kidney disease (Glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2)) was examined among 94 422 Taiwanese participants, aged ≥20 years with a mean 3.5 years follow-up in a retrospective cohort. The association between UA and CKD was evaluated using Cox models with adjustment for confounders.

RESULTS

The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for incident CKD was 1.03 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01 to 1.06) for baseline UA level (increase by 1 mg/dL). Compared with serum UA in the first quintile (2.0 to 4.5 mg/dL), the multivariate-adjusted HR for CKD of the fifth (≥7.3 mg/dL), fourth (6.3 to 7.2 mg/dL), third (5.5 to 6.2 mg/dL), second (4.6 to 5.4 mg/dL) and hyopuricemia (<2.0 mg/dL) were 1.15 (95%CI, 1.01-1.30), 0.98 (95%CI, 0.87-1.10), 1.06 (95%CI, 0.94-1.19), 1.02 (95%CI, 0.91-1.14) and 1.65(95%CI, 0.53-5.15), respectively. The tests for the non-linear association were all not significant for both male and female. Gender-specific model revealed only the UA above 7.3 mg/dL with the increased risk of new-onset CKD in males.

CONCLUSION

Hyperuricemia is a risk factor for CKD in Taiwan, future studies are still necessary to determine whether hypouricemia increases the risk of CKD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Bio-statistics, School of Public Health, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21854506

Citation

Wang, Shengfeng, et al. "Uric Acid and Incident Chronic Kidney Disease in a Large Health Check-up Population in Taiwan." Nephrology (Carlton, Vic.), vol. 16, no. 8, 2011, pp. 767-76.
Wang S, Shu Z, Tao Q, et al. Uric acid and incident chronic kidney disease in a large health check-up population in Taiwan. Nephrology (Carlton). 2011;16(8):767-76.
Wang, S., Shu, Z., Tao, Q., Yu, C., Zhan, S., & Li, L. (2011). Uric acid and incident chronic kidney disease in a large health check-up population in Taiwan. Nephrology (Carlton, Vic.), 16(8), 767-76. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1797.2011.01513.x
Wang S, et al. Uric Acid and Incident Chronic Kidney Disease in a Large Health Check-up Population in Taiwan. Nephrology (Carlton). 2011;16(8):767-76. PubMed PMID: 21854506.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Uric acid and incident chronic kidney disease in a large health check-up population in Taiwan. AU - Wang,Shengfeng, AU - Shu,Zheng, AU - Tao,Qiushan, AU - Yu,Canqing, AU - Zhan,Siyan, AU - Li,Liming, PY - 2011/8/23/entrez PY - 2011/8/23/pubmed PY - 2012/3/6/medline SP - 767 EP - 76 JF - Nephrology (Carlton, Vic.) JO - Nephrology (Carlton) VL - 16 IS - 8 N2 - AIM: Uric acid (UA) is strongly associated with the confirmed chronic kidney disease (CKD) risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes and metabolic syndrome (MS); however, whether higher UA is independently associated with CKD is still debatable. Other studies found that low UA level may reflect inadequate protection against oxidant-mediated stress; it is also unknown whether hypouricemia may have a harmful effect on the kidney. No studies have examined whether there is a J-shaped relationship between UA and incident CKD. METHODS: The association between UA and incident kidney disease (Glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2)) was examined among 94 422 Taiwanese participants, aged ≥20 years with a mean 3.5 years follow-up in a retrospective cohort. The association between UA and CKD was evaluated using Cox models with adjustment for confounders. RESULTS: The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for incident CKD was 1.03 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01 to 1.06) for baseline UA level (increase by 1 mg/dL). Compared with serum UA in the first quintile (2.0 to 4.5 mg/dL), the multivariate-adjusted HR for CKD of the fifth (≥7.3 mg/dL), fourth (6.3 to 7.2 mg/dL), third (5.5 to 6.2 mg/dL), second (4.6 to 5.4 mg/dL) and hyopuricemia (<2.0 mg/dL) were 1.15 (95%CI, 1.01-1.30), 0.98 (95%CI, 0.87-1.10), 1.06 (95%CI, 0.94-1.19), 1.02 (95%CI, 0.91-1.14) and 1.65(95%CI, 0.53-5.15), respectively. The tests for the non-linear association were all not significant for both male and female. Gender-specific model revealed only the UA above 7.3 mg/dL with the increased risk of new-onset CKD in males. CONCLUSION: Hyperuricemia is a risk factor for CKD in Taiwan, future studies are still necessary to determine whether hypouricemia increases the risk of CKD. SN - 1440-1797 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21854506/Uric_acid_and_incident_chronic_kidney_disease_in_a_large_health_check_up_population_in_Taiwan_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1797.2011.01513.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -