Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Medicines reconciliation using a shared electronic health care record.
J Patient Saf. 2011 Sep; 7(3):148-54.JP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

: This study aimed to evaluate the use of a shared electronic primary health care record (EHR) to assist with medicines reconciliation in the hospital from admission to discharge.

METHODS

: This is a prospective cross-sectional, comparison evaluation for 2 phases, in a short-term elderly admissions ward in the United Kingdom. In phase 1, full reconciliation of the medication history was attempted, using conventional methods, before accessing the EHR, and then the EHR was used to verify the reconciliation. In phase 2, the EHR was the initial method of retrieving the medication history-validated by conventional methods.

RESULTS

: Where reconciliation was led by conventional methods, and before any access to the EHR was attempted, 28 (28%) of hospital prescriptions were found to contain errors. Of 99 prescriptions subsequently checked using the EHR, only 50 (50%) matched the EHR. Of the remainder, 25% of prescriptions contained errors when verified by the EHR. However, 26% of patients had an incorrect list of current medications on the EHR.Using the EHR as the primary method of reconciliation, 33 (32%) of 102 prescriptions matched the EHR. Of those that did not match, 39 (38%) of prescriptions were found to contain errors. Furthermore, 37 (36%) of patients had an incorrect list of current medications on the EHR.The most common error type on the discharge prescription was drug omission; and on the EHR, wrong drug. Common potentially serious errors were related to unidentified allergies and adverse drug reactions.

CONCLUSIONS

: The EHR can reduce medication errors. However, the EHR should be seen as one of a range of information sources for reconciliation; the primary source being the patient or their carer. Both primary care and hospital clinicians should have read-and-write access to the EHR to reduce errors at care transitions. We recommend further evaluation studies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Bradford Institute for Health Research, Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21857238

Citation

Moore, Philip, et al. "Medicines Reconciliation Using a Shared Electronic Health Care Record." Journal of Patient Safety, vol. 7, no. 3, 2011, pp. 148-54.
Moore P, Armitage G, Wright J, et al. Medicines reconciliation using a shared electronic health care record. J Patient Saf. 2011;7(3):148-54.
Moore, P., Armitage, G., Wright, J., Dobrzanski, S., Ansari, N., Hammond, I., & Scally, A. (2011). Medicines reconciliation using a shared electronic health care record. Journal of Patient Safety, 7(3), 148-54. https://doi.org/10.1097/PTS.0b013e31822c5bf9
Moore P, et al. Medicines Reconciliation Using a Shared Electronic Health Care Record. J Patient Saf. 2011;7(3):148-54. PubMed PMID: 21857238.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Medicines reconciliation using a shared electronic health care record. AU - Moore,Philip, AU - Armitage,Gerry, AU - Wright,John, AU - Dobrzanski,Stan, AU - Ansari,Nafeesa, AU - Hammond,Ian, AU - Scally,Andy, PY - 2011/8/23/entrez PY - 2011/8/23/pubmed PY - 2011/12/23/medline SP - 148 EP - 54 JF - Journal of patient safety JO - J Patient Saf VL - 7 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: : This study aimed to evaluate the use of a shared electronic primary health care record (EHR) to assist with medicines reconciliation in the hospital from admission to discharge. METHODS: : This is a prospective cross-sectional, comparison evaluation for 2 phases, in a short-term elderly admissions ward in the United Kingdom. In phase 1, full reconciliation of the medication history was attempted, using conventional methods, before accessing the EHR, and then the EHR was used to verify the reconciliation. In phase 2, the EHR was the initial method of retrieving the medication history-validated by conventional methods. RESULTS: : Where reconciliation was led by conventional methods, and before any access to the EHR was attempted, 28 (28%) of hospital prescriptions were found to contain errors. Of 99 prescriptions subsequently checked using the EHR, only 50 (50%) matched the EHR. Of the remainder, 25% of prescriptions contained errors when verified by the EHR. However, 26% of patients had an incorrect list of current medications on the EHR.Using the EHR as the primary method of reconciliation, 33 (32%) of 102 prescriptions matched the EHR. Of those that did not match, 39 (38%) of prescriptions were found to contain errors. Furthermore, 37 (36%) of patients had an incorrect list of current medications on the EHR.The most common error type on the discharge prescription was drug omission; and on the EHR, wrong drug. Common potentially serious errors were related to unidentified allergies and adverse drug reactions. CONCLUSIONS: : The EHR can reduce medication errors. However, the EHR should be seen as one of a range of information sources for reconciliation; the primary source being the patient or their carer. Both primary care and hospital clinicians should have read-and-write access to the EHR to reduce errors at care transitions. We recommend further evaluation studies. SN - 1549-8425 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21857238/Medicines_reconciliation_using_a_shared_electronic_health_care_record_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PTS.0b013e31822c5bf9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -