Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The nocebo effect and its relevance for clinical practice.
Psychosom Med 2011; 73(7):598-603PM

Abstract

Negative expectations deriving from the clinical encounter can produce negative outcomes, known as nocebo effects. Specifically, research on the nocebo effect indicates that information disclosure about potential side effects can itself contribute to producing adverse effects. Neurobiological processes play a role in the nocebo effect, and this article provides a selective review of mechanistic research on the nocebo effect. Comparatively little attention has been directed to clinical studies and their implications for daily clinical practice. The nocebo response is influenced by the content and the way information is presented to patients in clinical trials in both the placebo and active treatment conditions. Nocebo effects adversely influence quality of life and therapy adherence, emphasizing the need for minimizing these responses to the extent possible. Evidence further indicates that the informed consent process in clinical trials may induce nocebo effects. This article concludes with ethical directions for future patient-oriented research and routine practice.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Bioethics, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bldg 10, Room 1C118, Bethesda, MD 20892-1156, USA. luana.colloca@nih.govNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21862825

Citation

Colloca, Luana, and Franklin G. Miller. "The Nocebo Effect and Its Relevance for Clinical Practice." Psychosomatic Medicine, vol. 73, no. 7, 2011, pp. 598-603.
Colloca L, Miller FG. The nocebo effect and its relevance for clinical practice. Psychosom Med. 2011;73(7):598-603.
Colloca, L., & Miller, F. G. (2011). The nocebo effect and its relevance for clinical practice. Psychosomatic Medicine, 73(7), pp. 598-603. doi:10.1097/PSY.0b013e3182294a50.
Colloca L, Miller FG. The Nocebo Effect and Its Relevance for Clinical Practice. Psychosom Med. 2011;73(7):598-603. PubMed PMID: 21862825.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The nocebo effect and its relevance for clinical practice. AU - Colloca,Luana, AU - Miller,Franklin G, Y1 - 2011/08/23/ PY - 2011/8/25/entrez PY - 2011/8/25/pubmed PY - 2012/1/27/medline SP - 598 EP - 603 JF - Psychosomatic medicine JO - Psychosom Med VL - 73 IS - 7 N2 - Negative expectations deriving from the clinical encounter can produce negative outcomes, known as nocebo effects. Specifically, research on the nocebo effect indicates that information disclosure about potential side effects can itself contribute to producing adverse effects. Neurobiological processes play a role in the nocebo effect, and this article provides a selective review of mechanistic research on the nocebo effect. Comparatively little attention has been directed to clinical studies and their implications for daily clinical practice. The nocebo response is influenced by the content and the way information is presented to patients in clinical trials in both the placebo and active treatment conditions. Nocebo effects adversely influence quality of life and therapy adherence, emphasizing the need for minimizing these responses to the extent possible. Evidence further indicates that the informed consent process in clinical trials may induce nocebo effects. This article concludes with ethical directions for future patient-oriented research and routine practice. SN - 1534-7796 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21862825/The_nocebo_effect_and_its_relevance_for_clinical_practice_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=21862825 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -