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Antioxidants and self-reported history of kidney stones: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.
J Endourol 2011; 25(12):1903-8JE

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

Animal studies have demonstrated the likely role of oxidative tissue damage in the pathophysiology of stone disease; however, the effect of antioxidants on stone formation in the human population is unknown. We evaluated the association between serum antioxidant levels and the self-reported prevalence of kidney stones in a large cross-sectional population in a retrospective cohort study.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Serum levels of antioxidants among adult participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) 1988-1994 were compared between those with and without a self-reported history of kidney stones, adjusting for covariates of age, sex, body mass index (BMI), race/ethnicity, diabetes, and hypertension.

RESULTS

The prevalence of kidney stones was 5.25% (95% confidence interval: 4.60%, 5.90%). The prevalence of kidney stones was higher in males, white/non-Hispanics, diabetics, and those with hypertension. The prevalence of kidney stones increased with BMI. After adjusting for covariates, mean levels of alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and beta-cryptoxanthin were significantly lower in those with kidney stones (-9.36%, -10.79%, and -8.48%, respectively). When analyzed by quartile, higher serum levels of beta-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthin,, trended toward a decreasing prevalence of stones (P=0.007 and P=0.03, respectively), indicating that the highest levels of these antioxidants may protect against the formation of kidney stones.

CONCLUSIONS

Lower levels of alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and beta-cryptoxanthin are associated with a history of kidney stones and may indicate a role for these antioxidants in preventing stone formation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Urology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242-1089, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21864023

Citation

Holoch, Peter A., and Chad R. Tracy. "Antioxidants and Self-reported History of Kidney Stones: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey." Journal of Endourology, vol. 25, no. 12, 2011, pp. 1903-8.
Holoch PA, Tracy CR. Antioxidants and self-reported history of kidney stones: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. J Endourol. 2011;25(12):1903-8.
Holoch, P. A., & Tracy, C. R. (2011). Antioxidants and self-reported history of kidney stones: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Journal of Endourology, 25(12), pp. 1903-8. doi:10.1089/end.2011.0130.
Holoch PA, Tracy CR. Antioxidants and Self-reported History of Kidney Stones: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. J Endourol. 2011;25(12):1903-8. PubMed PMID: 21864023.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Antioxidants and self-reported history of kidney stones: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. AU - Holoch,Peter A, AU - Tracy,Chad R, Y1 - 2011/08/24/ PY - 2011/8/26/entrez PY - 2011/8/26/pubmed PY - 2012/3/21/medline SP - 1903 EP - 8 JF - Journal of endourology JO - J. Endourol. VL - 25 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Animal studies have demonstrated the likely role of oxidative tissue damage in the pathophysiology of stone disease; however, the effect of antioxidants on stone formation in the human population is unknown. We evaluated the association between serum antioxidant levels and the self-reported prevalence of kidney stones in a large cross-sectional population in a retrospective cohort study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Serum levels of antioxidants among adult participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) 1988-1994 were compared between those with and without a self-reported history of kidney stones, adjusting for covariates of age, sex, body mass index (BMI), race/ethnicity, diabetes, and hypertension. RESULTS: The prevalence of kidney stones was 5.25% (95% confidence interval: 4.60%, 5.90%). The prevalence of kidney stones was higher in males, white/non-Hispanics, diabetics, and those with hypertension. The prevalence of kidney stones increased with BMI. After adjusting for covariates, mean levels of alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and beta-cryptoxanthin were significantly lower in those with kidney stones (-9.36%, -10.79%, and -8.48%, respectively). When analyzed by quartile, higher serum levels of beta-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthin,, trended toward a decreasing prevalence of stones (P=0.007 and P=0.03, respectively), indicating that the highest levels of these antioxidants may protect against the formation of kidney stones. CONCLUSIONS: Lower levels of alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and beta-cryptoxanthin are associated with a history of kidney stones and may indicate a role for these antioxidants in preventing stone formation. SN - 1557-900X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21864023/Antioxidants_and_self_reported_history_of_kidney_stones:_the_National_Health_and_Nutrition_Examination_Survey_ L2 - https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/end.2011.0130?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -