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Fish oil supplementation during late pregnancy does not influence plasma lipids or lipoprotein levels in young adult offspring.
Lipids 2011; 46(12):1091-9L

Abstract

Nutritional influences on cardiovascular disease operate throughout life. Studies in both experimental animals and humans have suggested that changes in the peri- and early post-natal nutrition can affect the development of the various components of the metabolic syndrome in adult life. This has lead to the hypothesis that n-3 fatty acid supplementation in pregnancy may have a beneficial effect on lipid profile in the offspring. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of supplementation with n-3 fatty acids during the third trimester of pregnancy on lipids and lipoproteins in the 19-year-old offspring. The study was based on the follow-up of a randomized controlled trial from 1990 where 533 pregnant women were randomized to fish oil (n = 266), olive oil (n = 136) or no oil (n = 131). In 2009, the offspring were invited to a physical examination including blood sampling. A total of 243 of the offspring participated. Lipid values did not differ between the fish oil and olive oil groups. The relative adjusted difference (95% confidence intervals) in lipid concentrations was -3% (-11; 7) for LDL cholesterol, 3% (-3; 10) for HDL cholesterol, -1% (-6; 5) for total cholesterol,-4% (-16; 10) for TAG concentrations, 2%(-2; 7) for apolipoprotein A1, -1% (-9; 7) for apolipoprotein B and 3% (-7; 15) in relative abundance of small dense LDL. In conclusion, there was no effect of fish oil supplementation during the third trimester of pregnancy on offspring plasma lipids and lipoproteins in adolescence.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Aarhus University, Denmark. dr@soci.au.dkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21874272

Citation

Rytter, Dorte, et al. "Fish Oil Supplementation During Late Pregnancy Does Not Influence Plasma Lipids or Lipoprotein Levels in Young Adult Offspring." Lipids, vol. 46, no. 12, 2011, pp. 1091-9.
Rytter D, Schmidt EB, Bech BH, et al. Fish oil supplementation during late pregnancy does not influence plasma lipids or lipoprotein levels in young adult offspring. Lipids. 2011;46(12):1091-9.
Rytter, D., Schmidt, E. B., Bech, B. H., Christensen, J. H., Henriksen, T. B., & Olsen, S. F. (2011). Fish oil supplementation during late pregnancy does not influence plasma lipids or lipoprotein levels in young adult offspring. Lipids, 46(12), pp. 1091-9. doi:10.1007/s11745-011-3606-5.
Rytter D, et al. Fish Oil Supplementation During Late Pregnancy Does Not Influence Plasma Lipids or Lipoprotein Levels in Young Adult Offspring. Lipids. 2011;46(12):1091-9. PubMed PMID: 21874272.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fish oil supplementation during late pregnancy does not influence plasma lipids or lipoprotein levels in young adult offspring. AU - Rytter,Dorte, AU - Schmidt,Erik B, AU - Bech,Bodil H, AU - Christensen,Jeppe H, AU - Henriksen,Tine B, AU - Olsen,Sjurdur F, Y1 - 2011/08/27/ PY - 2011/06/03/received PY - 2011/07/26/accepted PY - 2011/8/30/entrez PY - 2011/8/30/pubmed PY - 2012/3/1/medline SP - 1091 EP - 9 JF - Lipids JO - Lipids VL - 46 IS - 12 N2 - Nutritional influences on cardiovascular disease operate throughout life. Studies in both experimental animals and humans have suggested that changes in the peri- and early post-natal nutrition can affect the development of the various components of the metabolic syndrome in adult life. This has lead to the hypothesis that n-3 fatty acid supplementation in pregnancy may have a beneficial effect on lipid profile in the offspring. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of supplementation with n-3 fatty acids during the third trimester of pregnancy on lipids and lipoproteins in the 19-year-old offspring. The study was based on the follow-up of a randomized controlled trial from 1990 where 533 pregnant women were randomized to fish oil (n = 266), olive oil (n = 136) or no oil (n = 131). In 2009, the offspring were invited to a physical examination including blood sampling. A total of 243 of the offspring participated. Lipid values did not differ between the fish oil and olive oil groups. The relative adjusted difference (95% confidence intervals) in lipid concentrations was -3% (-11; 7) for LDL cholesterol, 3% (-3; 10) for HDL cholesterol, -1% (-6; 5) for total cholesterol,-4% (-16; 10) for TAG concentrations, 2%(-2; 7) for apolipoprotein A1, -1% (-9; 7) for apolipoprotein B and 3% (-7; 15) in relative abundance of small dense LDL. In conclusion, there was no effect of fish oil supplementation during the third trimester of pregnancy on offspring plasma lipids and lipoproteins in adolescence. SN - 1558-9307 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21874272/Fish_oil_supplementation_during_late_pregnancy_does_not_influence_plasma_lipids_or_lipoprotein_levels_in_young_adult_offspring_ L2 - https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11745-011-3606-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -