Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Comparison of odor-active compounds in grapes and wines from vitis vinifera and non-foxy American grape species.
J Agric Food Chem. 2011 Oct 12; 59(19):10657-64.JA

Abstract

Native American grape (Vitis) species have many desirable properties for winegrape breeding, but hybrids of these non-vinifera wild grapes with Vitis vinifera often have undesirable aromas. Other than the foxy-smelling compounds in Vitis labrusca and Vitis rotundifolia , the aromas inherent to American Vitis species are not well characterized. In this paper, the key odorants in wine produced from the American grape species Vitis riparia and Vitis cinerea were characterized in comparison to wine produced from European winegrapes (V. vinifera). Volatile compounds were extracted by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and identified by gas chromatography-olfactometry/mass spectrometry (GC-O/MS). On the basis of flavor dilution values, most grape-derived compounds with fruity and floral aromas were at similar potency, but non-vinifera wines had higher concentrations of odorants with vegetative and earthy aromas: eugenol, cis-3-hexenol, 1,8-cineole, 3-isobutyl-2-methoxypyrazine (IBMP), and 3-isopropyl-2-methoxypyrazine (IPMP). Elevated concentrations of these compounds in non-vinifera wines were confirmed by quantitative GC-MS. Concentrations of IBMP and IPMP were well above sensory threshold in both non-vinifera wines. In a follow-up study, IBMP and IPMP were surveyed in 31 accessions of V. riparia, V. rupestris, and V. cinerea. Some accessions had concentrations of >350 pg/g IBMP or >30 pg/g IPMP, well above concentrations reported in previous studies of harvest-ripe vinifera grapes. Methyl anthranilate and 2-aminoacetophenone, key odorants responsible for the foxiness of V. labrusca grapes, were undetectable in both the V. riparia and V. cinerea wines (<10 μg/L).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Food Science, NYSAES, Cornell University , 630 West North Street, Geneva, New York 14456, United States.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21879766

Citation

Sun, Qun, et al. "Comparison of Odor-active Compounds in Grapes and Wines From Vitis Vinifera and Non-foxy American Grape Species." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol. 59, no. 19, 2011, pp. 10657-64.
Sun Q, Gates MJ, Lavin EH, et al. Comparison of odor-active compounds in grapes and wines from vitis vinifera and non-foxy American grape species. J Agric Food Chem. 2011;59(19):10657-64.
Sun, Q., Gates, M. J., Lavin, E. H., Acree, T. E., & Sacks, G. L. (2011). Comparison of odor-active compounds in grapes and wines from vitis vinifera and non-foxy American grape species. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 59(19), 10657-64. https://doi.org/10.1021/jf2026204
Sun Q, et al. Comparison of Odor-active Compounds in Grapes and Wines From Vitis Vinifera and Non-foxy American Grape Species. J Agric Food Chem. 2011 Oct 12;59(19):10657-64. PubMed PMID: 21879766.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Comparison of odor-active compounds in grapes and wines from vitis vinifera and non-foxy American grape species. AU - Sun,Qun, AU - Gates,Matthew J, AU - Lavin,Edward H, AU - Acree,Terry E, AU - Sacks,Gavin L, Y1 - 2011/09/13/ PY - 2011/9/2/entrez PY - 2011/9/2/pubmed PY - 2012/2/1/medline SP - 10657 EP - 64 JF - Journal of agricultural and food chemistry JO - J. Agric. Food Chem. VL - 59 IS - 19 N2 - Native American grape (Vitis) species have many desirable properties for winegrape breeding, but hybrids of these non-vinifera wild grapes with Vitis vinifera often have undesirable aromas. Other than the foxy-smelling compounds in Vitis labrusca and Vitis rotundifolia , the aromas inherent to American Vitis species are not well characterized. In this paper, the key odorants in wine produced from the American grape species Vitis riparia and Vitis cinerea were characterized in comparison to wine produced from European winegrapes (V. vinifera). Volatile compounds were extracted by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and identified by gas chromatography-olfactometry/mass spectrometry (GC-O/MS). On the basis of flavor dilution values, most grape-derived compounds with fruity and floral aromas were at similar potency, but non-vinifera wines had higher concentrations of odorants with vegetative and earthy aromas: eugenol, cis-3-hexenol, 1,8-cineole, 3-isobutyl-2-methoxypyrazine (IBMP), and 3-isopropyl-2-methoxypyrazine (IPMP). Elevated concentrations of these compounds in non-vinifera wines were confirmed by quantitative GC-MS. Concentrations of IBMP and IPMP were well above sensory threshold in both non-vinifera wines. In a follow-up study, IBMP and IPMP were surveyed in 31 accessions of V. riparia, V. rupestris, and V. cinerea. Some accessions had concentrations of >350 pg/g IBMP or >30 pg/g IPMP, well above concentrations reported in previous studies of harvest-ripe vinifera grapes. Methyl anthranilate and 2-aminoacetophenone, key odorants responsible for the foxiness of V. labrusca grapes, were undetectable in both the V. riparia and V. cinerea wines (<10 μg/L). SN - 1520-5118 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21879766/Comparison_of_odor_active_compounds_in_grapes_and_wines_from_vitis_vinifera_and_non_foxy_American_grape_species_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf2026204 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -