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Survey of colleges and schools of veterinary medicine regarding education in complementary and alternative veterinary medicine.
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2011 Sep 01; 239(5):619-23.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To obtain information on educational programs offered in complementary and alternative veterinary medicine (CAVM) among AVMA Council on Education (COE)-accredited colleges and schools of veterinary medicine.

DESIGN

Survey.

SAMPLE

41 COE-accredited colleges and schools of veterinary medicine.

PROCEDURE

A questionnaire was e-mailed to academic deans at all COE-accredited colleges and schools of veterinary medicine.

RESULTS

Responses were received from 34 of 41 schools: 26 in the United States, 2 in Canada, 3 in Australia and New Zealand, and 3 in Europe. Sixteen schools indicated that they offered a CAVM course. Nutritional therapy, acupuncture, and rehabilitation or physical therapy were topics most commonly included in the curriculum. One school required a course in CAVM; all other courses were elective, most of which were 1 to 2 credit hours. Courses were usually a combination of lecture and laboratory; 2 were lecture only, and 1 was laboratory only. Of the 18 schools that reported no courses in CAVM, many addressed some CAVM topics in other courses and 4 indicated plans to offer some type of CAVM course within the next 5 years.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The consensus among survey respondents was that CAVM is an important topic that should be addressed in veterinary medical education, but opinions varied as to the appropriate framework. The most common comment reflected strong opinions that inclusion of CAVM in veterinary medical curricula must be evidence-based. Respondents indicated that students should be aware of CAVM modalities because of strong public interest in CAVM and because practitioners should be able to address client questions from a position of knowledge.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, USA. memon@vetmed.wsu.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21879961

Citation

Memon, Mushtaq A., and Leslie K. Sprunger. "Survey of Colleges and Schools of Veterinary Medicine Regarding Education in Complementary and Alternative Veterinary Medicine." Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, vol. 239, no. 5, 2011, pp. 619-23.
Memon MA, Sprunger LK. Survey of colleges and schools of veterinary medicine regarding education in complementary and alternative veterinary medicine. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2011;239(5):619-23.
Memon, M. A., & Sprunger, L. K. (2011). Survey of colleges and schools of veterinary medicine regarding education in complementary and alternative veterinary medicine. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 239(5), 619-23. https://doi.org/10.2460/javma.239.5.619
Memon MA, Sprunger LK. Survey of Colleges and Schools of Veterinary Medicine Regarding Education in Complementary and Alternative Veterinary Medicine. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2011 Sep 1;239(5):619-23. PubMed PMID: 21879961.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Survey of colleges and schools of veterinary medicine regarding education in complementary and alternative veterinary medicine. AU - Memon,Mushtaq A, AU - Sprunger,Leslie K, PY - 2011/9/2/entrez PY - 2011/9/2/pubmed PY - 2011/12/29/medline SP - 619 EP - 23 JF - Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association JO - J Am Vet Med Assoc VL - 239 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To obtain information on educational programs offered in complementary and alternative veterinary medicine (CAVM) among AVMA Council on Education (COE)-accredited colleges and schools of veterinary medicine. DESIGN: Survey. SAMPLE: 41 COE-accredited colleges and schools of veterinary medicine. PROCEDURE: A questionnaire was e-mailed to academic deans at all COE-accredited colleges and schools of veterinary medicine. RESULTS: Responses were received from 34 of 41 schools: 26 in the United States, 2 in Canada, 3 in Australia and New Zealand, and 3 in Europe. Sixteen schools indicated that they offered a CAVM course. Nutritional therapy, acupuncture, and rehabilitation or physical therapy were topics most commonly included in the curriculum. One school required a course in CAVM; all other courses were elective, most of which were 1 to 2 credit hours. Courses were usually a combination of lecture and laboratory; 2 were lecture only, and 1 was laboratory only. Of the 18 schools that reported no courses in CAVM, many addressed some CAVM topics in other courses and 4 indicated plans to offer some type of CAVM course within the next 5 years. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: The consensus among survey respondents was that CAVM is an important topic that should be addressed in veterinary medical education, but opinions varied as to the appropriate framework. The most common comment reflected strong opinions that inclusion of CAVM in veterinary medical curricula must be evidence-based. Respondents indicated that students should be aware of CAVM modalities because of strong public interest in CAVM and because practitioners should be able to address client questions from a position of knowledge. SN - 1943-569X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21879961/Survey_of_colleges_and_schools_of_veterinary_medicine_regarding_education_in_complementary_and_alternative_veterinary_medicine_ L2 - https://avmajournals.avma.org/doi/10.2460/javma.239.5.619?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -