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Linking long-term dietary patterns with gut microbial enterotypes.
Science 2011; 334(6052):105-8Sci

Abstract

Diet strongly affects human health, partly by modulating gut microbiome composition. We used diet inventories and 16S rDNA sequencing to characterize fecal samples from 98 individuals. Fecal communities clustered into enterotypes distinguished primarily by levels of Bacteroides and Prevotella. Enterotypes were strongly associated with long-term diets, particularly protein and animal fat (Bacteroides) versus carbohydrates (Prevotella). A controlled-feeding study of 10 subjects showed that microbiome composition changed detectably within 24 hours of initiating a high-fat/low-fiber or low-fat/high-fiber diet, but that enterotype identity remained stable during the 10-day study. Thus, alternative enterotype states are associated with long-term diet.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Gastroenterology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. gdwu@mail.med.upenn.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21885731

Citation

Wu, Gary D., et al. "Linking Long-term Dietary Patterns With Gut Microbial Enterotypes." Science (New York, N.Y.), vol. 334, no. 6052, 2011, pp. 105-8.
Wu GD, Chen J, Hoffmann C, et al. Linking long-term dietary patterns with gut microbial enterotypes. Science. 2011;334(6052):105-8.
Wu, G. D., Chen, J., Hoffmann, C., Bittinger, K., Chen, Y. Y., Keilbaugh, S. A., ... Lewis, J. D. (2011). Linking long-term dietary patterns with gut microbial enterotypes. Science (New York, N.Y.), 334(6052), pp. 105-8. doi:10.1126/science.1208344.
Wu GD, et al. Linking Long-term Dietary Patterns With Gut Microbial Enterotypes. Science. 2011 Oct 7;334(6052):105-8. PubMed PMID: 21885731.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Linking long-term dietary patterns with gut microbial enterotypes. AU - Wu,Gary D, AU - Chen,Jun, AU - Hoffmann,Christian, AU - Bittinger,Kyle, AU - Chen,Ying-Yu, AU - Keilbaugh,Sue A, AU - Bewtra,Meenakshi, AU - Knights,Dan, AU - Walters,William A, AU - Knight,Rob, AU - Sinha,Rohini, AU - Gilroy,Erin, AU - Gupta,Kernika, AU - Baldassano,Robert, AU - Nessel,Lisa, AU - Li,Hongzhe, AU - Bushman,Frederic D, AU - Lewis,James D, Y1 - 2011/09/01/ PY - 2011/9/3/entrez PY - 2011/9/3/pubmed PY - 2011/10/20/medline SP - 105 EP - 8 JF - Science (New York, N.Y.) JO - Science VL - 334 IS - 6052 N2 - Diet strongly affects human health, partly by modulating gut microbiome composition. We used diet inventories and 16S rDNA sequencing to characterize fecal samples from 98 individuals. Fecal communities clustered into enterotypes distinguished primarily by levels of Bacteroides and Prevotella. Enterotypes were strongly associated with long-term diets, particularly protein and animal fat (Bacteroides) versus carbohydrates (Prevotella). A controlled-feeding study of 10 subjects showed that microbiome composition changed detectably within 24 hours of initiating a high-fat/low-fiber or low-fat/high-fiber diet, but that enterotype identity remained stable during the 10-day study. Thus, alternative enterotype states are associated with long-term diet. SN - 1095-9203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21885731/Linking_long_term_dietary_patterns_with_gut_microbial_enterotypes_ L2 - http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=21885731 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -