Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Probiotics and prebiotics in the management of irritable bowel syndrome: a review of recent clinical trials and systematic reviews.
Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2011 Nov; 14(6):581-7.CO

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common disorder of the gastrointestinal tract, about which there has been considerable recent research. The aim of this article is to briefly review the aspects of IBS pathogenesis that involve the gastrointestinal microbiota, and then to critically appraise the recent and emerging evidence for the use of probiotics and prebiotics in its management.

RECENT FINDINGS

The increased risk of developing IBS following gastroenteritis and the co-existence of dysbiosis, elevated luminal gas production and immune activation, indicate that the gastrointestinal microbiota may be a therapeutic target in IBS. Most systematic reviews indicate that probiotics have a beneficial impact on global IBS symptoms, abdominal pain and flatulence. However, recent trials indicate that different probiotics can improve, have no effect, or even worsen symptoms, confirming that benefits are likely to be strain and symptom-specific. There are no recent clinical trials of prebiotics in IBS, although previous studies indicate potential benefit at lower doses.

SUMMARY

Clearly, some probiotics have considerable potential in the management of IBS; however, the benefits are likely to be strain-specific. Preliminary studies suggest low doses of prebiotics may improve symptoms of IBS, although further robust clinical trials are required.

Authors+Show Affiliations

King's College London, School of Medicine, Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences Division, London, UK. kevin.whelan@kcl.ac.uk

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21892075

Citation

Whelan, Kevin. "Probiotics and Prebiotics in the Management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome: a Review of Recent Clinical Trials and Systematic Reviews." Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care, vol. 14, no. 6, 2011, pp. 581-7.
Whelan K. Probiotics and prebiotics in the management of irritable bowel syndrome: a review of recent clinical trials and systematic reviews. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2011;14(6):581-7.
Whelan, K. (2011). Probiotics and prebiotics in the management of irritable bowel syndrome: a review of recent clinical trials and systematic reviews. Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care, 14(6), 581-7. https://doi.org/10.1097/MCO.0b013e32834b8082
Whelan K. Probiotics and Prebiotics in the Management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome: a Review of Recent Clinical Trials and Systematic Reviews. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2011;14(6):581-7. PubMed PMID: 21892075.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Probiotics and prebiotics in the management of irritable bowel syndrome: a review of recent clinical trials and systematic reviews. A1 - Whelan,Kevin, PY - 2011/9/6/entrez PY - 2011/9/6/pubmed PY - 2012/2/15/medline SP - 581 EP - 7 JF - Current opinion in clinical nutrition and metabolic care JO - Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care VL - 14 IS - 6 N2 - PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common disorder of the gastrointestinal tract, about which there has been considerable recent research. The aim of this article is to briefly review the aspects of IBS pathogenesis that involve the gastrointestinal microbiota, and then to critically appraise the recent and emerging evidence for the use of probiotics and prebiotics in its management. RECENT FINDINGS: The increased risk of developing IBS following gastroenteritis and the co-existence of dysbiosis, elevated luminal gas production and immune activation, indicate that the gastrointestinal microbiota may be a therapeutic target in IBS. Most systematic reviews indicate that probiotics have a beneficial impact on global IBS symptoms, abdominal pain and flatulence. However, recent trials indicate that different probiotics can improve, have no effect, or even worsen symptoms, confirming that benefits are likely to be strain and symptom-specific. There are no recent clinical trials of prebiotics in IBS, although previous studies indicate potential benefit at lower doses. SUMMARY: Clearly, some probiotics have considerable potential in the management of IBS; however, the benefits are likely to be strain-specific. Preliminary studies suggest low doses of prebiotics may improve symptoms of IBS, although further robust clinical trials are required. SN - 1473-6519 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21892075/Probiotics_and_prebiotics_in_the_management_of_irritable_bowel_syndrome:_a_review_of_recent_clinical_trials_and_systematic_reviews_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MCO.0b013e32834b8082 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -