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Symptoms of infectious diseases in immunocompromised travelers: a prospective study with matched controls.
J Travel Med. 2011 Sep-Oct; 18(5):318-26.JT

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Immunocompromised travelers to developing countries are thought to have symptomatic infectious diseases more often and longer than non-immunocompromised travelers. Evidence for this is lacking. This study evaluates whether immunocompromised short-term travelers are at increased risk of diseases.

METHODS

A prospective study was performed between October 2003 and May 2010 among adult travelers using immunosuppressive agents (ISA) and travelers with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), with their non-immunocompromised travel companions serving as matched controls with comparable exposure to infection. Data on symptoms of infectious diseases were recorded by using a structured diary.

RESULTS

Among 75 ISA, the incidence of travel-related diarrhea was 0.76 per person-month, and the number of symptomatic days 1.32 per month. For their 75 controls, figures were 0.66 and 1.50, respectively (p > 0.05). Among 71 IBD, the incidence was 1.19, and the number of symptomatic days was 2.48. For their 71 controls, figures were 0.73 and 1.31, respectively (p > 0.05). These differences also existed before travel. ISA had significantly more and longer travel-related signs of skin infection and IBD suffered more and longer from vomiting. As for other symptoms, no significant travel-related differences were found. Only 21% of immunocompromised travelers suffering from diarrhea used their stand-by antibiotics.

CONCLUSIONS

ISA and IBD did not have symptomatic infectious diseases more often or longer than non-immunocompromised travelers, except for signs of travel-related skin infection among ISA. Routine prescription of stand-by antibiotics for these immunocompromised travelers to areas with good health facilities is probably not more useful than for healthy travelers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Infectious Diseases, Public Health Service, GGD, Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. gijsbaaten@hotmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21896095

Citation

Baaten, Gijs G., et al. "Symptoms of Infectious Diseases in Immunocompromised Travelers: a Prospective Study With Matched Controls." Journal of Travel Medicine, vol. 18, no. 5, 2011, pp. 318-26.
Baaten GG, Geskus RB, Kint JA, et al. Symptoms of infectious diseases in immunocompromised travelers: a prospective study with matched controls. J Travel Med. 2011;18(5):318-26.
Baaten, G. G., Geskus, R. B., Kint, J. A., Roukens, A. H., Sonder, G. J., & van den Hoek, A. (2011). Symptoms of infectious diseases in immunocompromised travelers: a prospective study with matched controls. Journal of Travel Medicine, 18(5), 318-26. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1708-8305.2011.00543.x
Baaten GG, et al. Symptoms of Infectious Diseases in Immunocompromised Travelers: a Prospective Study With Matched Controls. J Travel Med. 2011 Sep-Oct;18(5):318-26. PubMed PMID: 21896095.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Symptoms of infectious diseases in immunocompromised travelers: a prospective study with matched controls. AU - Baaten,Gijs G, AU - Geskus,Ronald B, AU - Kint,Joan A, AU - Roukens,Anna H E, AU - Sonder,Gerard J, AU - van den Hoek,Anneke, Y1 - 2011/08/15/ PY - 2011/9/8/entrez PY - 2011/9/8/pubmed PY - 2012/1/27/medline SP - 318 EP - 26 JF - Journal of travel medicine JO - J Travel Med VL - 18 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Immunocompromised travelers to developing countries are thought to have symptomatic infectious diseases more often and longer than non-immunocompromised travelers. Evidence for this is lacking. This study evaluates whether immunocompromised short-term travelers are at increased risk of diseases. METHODS: A prospective study was performed between October 2003 and May 2010 among adult travelers using immunosuppressive agents (ISA) and travelers with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), with their non-immunocompromised travel companions serving as matched controls with comparable exposure to infection. Data on symptoms of infectious diseases were recorded by using a structured diary. RESULTS: Among 75 ISA, the incidence of travel-related diarrhea was 0.76 per person-month, and the number of symptomatic days 1.32 per month. For their 75 controls, figures were 0.66 and 1.50, respectively (p > 0.05). Among 71 IBD, the incidence was 1.19, and the number of symptomatic days was 2.48. For their 71 controls, figures were 0.73 and 1.31, respectively (p > 0.05). These differences also existed before travel. ISA had significantly more and longer travel-related signs of skin infection and IBD suffered more and longer from vomiting. As for other symptoms, no significant travel-related differences were found. Only 21% of immunocompromised travelers suffering from diarrhea used their stand-by antibiotics. CONCLUSIONS: ISA and IBD did not have symptomatic infectious diseases more often or longer than non-immunocompromised travelers, except for signs of travel-related skin infection among ISA. Routine prescription of stand-by antibiotics for these immunocompromised travelers to areas with good health facilities is probably not more useful than for healthy travelers. SN - 1708-8305 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21896095/Symptoms_of_infectious_diseases_in_immunocompromised_travelers:_a_prospective_study_with_matched_controls_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jtm/article-lookup/doi/10.1111/j.1708-8305.2011.00543.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -