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Depression and chronic medical illness.
J Clin Psychiatry. 1990 Jun; 51 Suppl:3-11; discussion 12-4.JC

Abstract

Major depression is the most common clinical problem primary care physicians are called upon to diagnose and treat. Depression is associated with high medical care utilization, amplification of somatic symptoms and disability, poor self-care and adherence to medical regimens, and increased morbidity and mortality from medical illness. Despite the high prevalence and the maladaptive effects of major depression on patients' lives, this affective illness is often not accurately diagnosed or effectively treated. Double-blind, placebo-controlled studies have increasingly demonstrated efficacy of the antidepressant agents in primary care patients, patients with chronic pain, and patients with comorbidity--chronic medical illness and major depression.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2189874

Citation

Katon, W, and M D. Sullivan. "Depression and Chronic Medical Illness." The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, vol. 51 Suppl, 1990, pp. 3-11; discussion 12-4.
Katon W, Sullivan MD. Depression and chronic medical illness. J Clin Psychiatry. 1990;51 Suppl:3-11; discussion 12-4.
Katon, W., & Sullivan, M. D. (1990). Depression and chronic medical illness. The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 51 Suppl, 3-11; discussion 12-4.
Katon W, Sullivan MD. Depression and Chronic Medical Illness. J Clin Psychiatry. 1990;51 Suppl:3-11; discussion 12-4. PubMed PMID: 2189874.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Depression and chronic medical illness. AU - Katon,W, AU - Sullivan,M D, PY - 1990/6/1/pubmed PY - 1990/6/1/medline PY - 1990/6/1/entrez SP - 3-11; discussion 12-4 JF - The Journal of clinical psychiatry JO - J Clin Psychiatry VL - 51 Suppl N2 - Major depression is the most common clinical problem primary care physicians are called upon to diagnose and treat. Depression is associated with high medical care utilization, amplification of somatic symptoms and disability, poor self-care and adherence to medical regimens, and increased morbidity and mortality from medical illness. Despite the high prevalence and the maladaptive effects of major depression on patients' lives, this affective illness is often not accurately diagnosed or effectively treated. Double-blind, placebo-controlled studies have increasingly demonstrated efficacy of the antidepressant agents in primary care patients, patients with chronic pain, and patients with comorbidity--chronic medical illness and major depression. SN - 0160-6689 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2189874/Depression_and_chronic_medical_illness_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/2199 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -