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Chief nursing officer executive development: a crisis or a challenge?
Nurs Adm Q. 2011 Oct-Dec; 35(4):344-53.NA

Abstract

The roles and responsibilities of nurses are expanding, as they become more involved in administration and leadership within their field. Nurses are taking on executive positions, which have become a crucial part of hospital organizations. With this expansion, an executive development program is necessary to provide nurses with the knowledge and competencies that these executive positions require. Their focus must evolve from singular bedside practice to the greater scope of health care administration. Leadership skills are extremely important, in addition to interpersonal, management, mentoring, and interprofessional skills. A number of nursing associations have worked to develop a set of curricula for nurse executive education, but a consistent and specific set of academic requirements has yet to be agreed upon. With the importance of the chief nursing officer's (CNO) role in the function of a hospital and the requirement of the knowledge of the changing health care system in the United States, it is essential that nurses are provided with proper education and training that will help them become successful nurse executives. Some suggestions include a dual MSN/MBA degree, a PhD in nursing, continuing education institutes, and mentoring programs. However, research must be done to clarify the best way to prepare CNOs for their roles.

Authors+Show Affiliations

DNS Program, The Graduate Center and Lehman College, City University of New York, New York, NY 10016, USA. Kfrederickson@gc.cuny.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21900820

Citation

Frederickson, Keville, and Donna Nickitas. "Chief Nursing Officer Executive Development: a Crisis or a Challenge?" Nursing Administration Quarterly, vol. 35, no. 4, 2011, pp. 344-53.
Frederickson K, Nickitas D. Chief nursing officer executive development: a crisis or a challenge? Nurs Adm Q. 2011;35(4):344-53.
Frederickson, K., & Nickitas, D. (2011). Chief nursing officer executive development: a crisis or a challenge? Nursing Administration Quarterly, 35(4), 344-53. https://doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0b013e31822f8e5c
Frederickson K, Nickitas D. Chief Nursing Officer Executive Development: a Crisis or a Challenge. Nurs Adm Q. 2011 Oct-Dec;35(4):344-53. PubMed PMID: 21900820.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Chief nursing officer executive development: a crisis or a challenge? AU - Frederickson,Keville, AU - Nickitas,Donna, PY - 2011/9/9/entrez PY - 2011/9/9/pubmed PY - 2012/1/12/medline SP - 344 EP - 53 JF - Nursing administration quarterly JO - Nurs Adm Q VL - 35 IS - 4 N2 - The roles and responsibilities of nurses are expanding, as they become more involved in administration and leadership within their field. Nurses are taking on executive positions, which have become a crucial part of hospital organizations. With this expansion, an executive development program is necessary to provide nurses with the knowledge and competencies that these executive positions require. Their focus must evolve from singular bedside practice to the greater scope of health care administration. Leadership skills are extremely important, in addition to interpersonal, management, mentoring, and interprofessional skills. A number of nursing associations have worked to develop a set of curricula for nurse executive education, but a consistent and specific set of academic requirements has yet to be agreed upon. With the importance of the chief nursing officer's (CNO) role in the function of a hospital and the requirement of the knowledge of the changing health care system in the United States, it is essential that nurses are provided with proper education and training that will help them become successful nurse executives. Some suggestions include a dual MSN/MBA degree, a PhD in nursing, continuing education institutes, and mentoring programs. However, research must be done to clarify the best way to prepare CNOs for their roles. SN - 1550-5103 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21900820/Chief_nursing_officer_executive_development:_a_crisis_or_a_challenge L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0b013e31822f8e5c DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -