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Resilience in infertile couples acts as a protective factor against infertility-specific distress and impaired quality of life.
J Assist Reprod Genet. 2011 Nov; 28(11):1111-7.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Our hypothesis was that resilience (=psychosocial stress-resistance) reduces infertility-specific distress and maintains quality of life of infertile couples.

METHODS

Questionnaire data of WHO Quality of Life assessment (WHOQOL; domains: 'physical', 'psychological', 'social relationships' and 'environment'), Fertility Problem Inventory (FPI; scales: 'social concern', 'sexual concern', 'relationship concern', 'rejection of childfree lifestyle' and 'need for parenthood'), Resilience Scale (RS), as well as sociographic and medical data were available for 199 infertile couples.

RESULTS

Age, medical diagnosis and 'intensity of desire for a child' had no influence on quality of life. High scores on 'suffering from childlessness' went along with less satisfaction on 'physical' and 'psychological' domains for the women only. For both partners, high scores on 'suffering from childlessness' went along with higher scores on all FPI scales. High resilience was associated with high scores on all WHOQOL domains for both partners, also with low scores on all FPI scales except for 'need for parenthood' for the women and with a low score only on 'relationship concern' for the men.

CONCLUSIONS

For infertile couples, resilience can be considered as an unspecific protective factor against infertility-specific distress and impaired quality of life. When offering counselling to involuntarily childless couples, awareness should be raised for resilience as a couple's resource and a "generic" factor of coping.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Medical Psychology, Centre for Psychosocial Medicine, University of Heidelberg, Bergheimer Straβe 20, 69115, Heidelberg, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21901362

Citation

Herrmann, Darja, et al. "Resilience in Infertile Couples Acts as a Protective Factor Against Infertility-specific Distress and Impaired Quality of Life." Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics, vol. 28, no. 11, 2011, pp. 1111-7.
Herrmann D, Scherg H, Verres R, et al. Resilience in infertile couples acts as a protective factor against infertility-specific distress and impaired quality of life. J Assist Reprod Genet. 2011;28(11):1111-7.
Herrmann, D., Scherg, H., Verres, R., von Hagens, C., Strowitzki, T., & Wischmann, T. (2011). Resilience in infertile couples acts as a protective factor against infertility-specific distress and impaired quality of life. Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics, 28(11), 1111-7. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10815-011-9637-2
Herrmann D, et al. Resilience in Infertile Couples Acts as a Protective Factor Against Infertility-specific Distress and Impaired Quality of Life. J Assist Reprod Genet. 2011;28(11):1111-7. PubMed PMID: 21901362.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Resilience in infertile couples acts as a protective factor against infertility-specific distress and impaired quality of life. AU - Herrmann,Darja, AU - Scherg,Horst, AU - Verres,Rolf, AU - von Hagens,Cornelia, AU - Strowitzki,Thomas, AU - Wischmann,Tewes, Y1 - 2011/09/08/ PY - 2011/06/16/received PY - 2011/08/31/accepted PY - 2011/9/9/entrez PY - 2011/9/9/pubmed PY - 2012/3/17/medline SP - 1111 EP - 7 JF - Journal of assisted reproduction and genetics JO - J Assist Reprod Genet VL - 28 IS - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Our hypothesis was that resilience (=psychosocial stress-resistance) reduces infertility-specific distress and maintains quality of life of infertile couples. METHODS: Questionnaire data of WHO Quality of Life assessment (WHOQOL; domains: 'physical', 'psychological', 'social relationships' and 'environment'), Fertility Problem Inventory (FPI; scales: 'social concern', 'sexual concern', 'relationship concern', 'rejection of childfree lifestyle' and 'need for parenthood'), Resilience Scale (RS), as well as sociographic and medical data were available for 199 infertile couples. RESULTS: Age, medical diagnosis and 'intensity of desire for a child' had no influence on quality of life. High scores on 'suffering from childlessness' went along with less satisfaction on 'physical' and 'psychological' domains for the women only. For both partners, high scores on 'suffering from childlessness' went along with higher scores on all FPI scales. High resilience was associated with high scores on all WHOQOL domains for both partners, also with low scores on all FPI scales except for 'need for parenthood' for the women and with a low score only on 'relationship concern' for the men. CONCLUSIONS: For infertile couples, resilience can be considered as an unspecific protective factor against infertility-specific distress and impaired quality of life. When offering counselling to involuntarily childless couples, awareness should be raised for resilience as a couple's resource and a "generic" factor of coping. SN - 1573-7330 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21901362/Resilience_in_infertile_couples_acts_as_a_protective_factor_against_infertility_specific_distress_and_impaired_quality_of_life_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10815-011-9637-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -