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Prevalence of mood disorders and service use among US mothers by race and ethnicity: results from the National Survey of American Life.
J Clin Psychiatry. 2011 Nov; 72(11):1538-45.JC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe the rates of mood disorders, the social and demographic correlates of mood disorders, and mental health services utilization among African American, Caribbean black, and non-Hispanic white mothers.

METHOD

Study data were collected between February 2001 and June 2003 as part of the National Survey of American Life: Coping With Stress in the 21st Century. National household probability samples of African Americans and Caribbean blacks were surveyed using a slightly modified World Mental Health version of the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Participants included 2,019 African American, 799 Caribbean black, and 400 non-Hispanic white mothers 18 years and older (N = 3,218). The main outcomes measured were lifetime and 12-month diagnoses of DSM-IV mood disorders (major depressive episode, dysthymic disorder, bipolar I and II disorders) and mental health services utilization.

RESULTS

The lifetime prevalence estimate of mood disorders is higher for white mothers (21.67%) than for African American mothers (16.77%) and Caribbean black mothers (16.42%); however, 12-month mood disorder estimates are similar across groups. African American mothers have higher 12-month prevalence estimates of bipolar disorder (2.48%) than white mothers (0.59%) and Caribbean black mothers (1.16%). African American mothers with higher education levels and white mothers who became parents as teenagers are more likely to have a lifetime mood disorder. Less than half (45.8%) of black mothers with a past 12-month mood disorder diagnosis utilized mental health services. Among black mothers with a 12-month diagnosis of bipolar disorder, Caribbean blacks utilized mental health services at higher rates than African Americans.

CONCLUSIONS

Demographic correlates for mood disorders varied by race and ethnicity. The findings illustrated underutilization of treatment by black mothers, especially African American mothers with bipolar disorder.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. rboyd@mail.med.upenn.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21903030

Citation

Boyd, Rhonda C., et al. "Prevalence of Mood Disorders and Service Use Among US Mothers By Race and Ethnicity: Results From the National Survey of American Life." The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, vol. 72, no. 11, 2011, pp. 1538-45.
Boyd RC, Joe S, Michalopoulos L, et al. Prevalence of mood disorders and service use among US mothers by race and ethnicity: results from the National Survey of American Life. J Clin Psychiatry. 2011;72(11):1538-45.
Boyd, R. C., Joe, S., Michalopoulos, L., Davis, E., & Jackson, J. S. (2011). Prevalence of mood disorders and service use among US mothers by race and ethnicity: results from the National Survey of American Life. The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 72(11), 1538-45. https://doi.org/10.4088/JCP.10m06468
Boyd RC, et al. Prevalence of Mood Disorders and Service Use Among US Mothers By Race and Ethnicity: Results From the National Survey of American Life. J Clin Psychiatry. 2011;72(11):1538-45. PubMed PMID: 21903030.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence of mood disorders and service use among US mothers by race and ethnicity: results from the National Survey of American Life. AU - Boyd,Rhonda C, AU - Joe,Sean, AU - Michalopoulos,Lynn, AU - Davis,Erica, AU - Jackson,James S, Y1 - 2011/08/23/ PY - 2010/08/03/received PY - 2011/01/03/accepted PY - 2011/9/10/entrez PY - 2011/9/10/pubmed PY - 2012/1/19/medline SP - 1538 EP - 45 JF - The Journal of clinical psychiatry JO - J Clin Psychiatry VL - 72 IS - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To describe the rates of mood disorders, the social and demographic correlates of mood disorders, and mental health services utilization among African American, Caribbean black, and non-Hispanic white mothers. METHOD: Study data were collected between February 2001 and June 2003 as part of the National Survey of American Life: Coping With Stress in the 21st Century. National household probability samples of African Americans and Caribbean blacks were surveyed using a slightly modified World Mental Health version of the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Participants included 2,019 African American, 799 Caribbean black, and 400 non-Hispanic white mothers 18 years and older (N = 3,218). The main outcomes measured were lifetime and 12-month diagnoses of DSM-IV mood disorders (major depressive episode, dysthymic disorder, bipolar I and II disorders) and mental health services utilization. RESULTS: The lifetime prevalence estimate of mood disorders is higher for white mothers (21.67%) than for African American mothers (16.77%) and Caribbean black mothers (16.42%); however, 12-month mood disorder estimates are similar across groups. African American mothers have higher 12-month prevalence estimates of bipolar disorder (2.48%) than white mothers (0.59%) and Caribbean black mothers (1.16%). African American mothers with higher education levels and white mothers who became parents as teenagers are more likely to have a lifetime mood disorder. Less than half (45.8%) of black mothers with a past 12-month mood disorder diagnosis utilized mental health services. Among black mothers with a 12-month diagnosis of bipolar disorder, Caribbean blacks utilized mental health services at higher rates than African Americans. CONCLUSIONS: Demographic correlates for mood disorders varied by race and ethnicity. The findings illustrated underutilization of treatment by black mothers, especially African American mothers with bipolar disorder. SN - 1555-2101 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21903030/Prevalence_of_mood_disorders_and_service_use_among_US_mothers_by_race_and_ethnicity:_results_from_the_National_Survey_of_American_Life_ L2 - http://www.psychiatrist.com/jcp/article/pages/2011/v72n11/v72n1114.aspx DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -