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Food intake, postprandial glucose, insulin and subjective satiety responses to three different bread-based test meals.
Appetite. 2011 Dec; 57(3):707-10.A

Abstract

The effect of bread consumption on overall food intake is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to measure postprandial food intake after a set breakfast containing three different breads. Ten males and 10 females aged 20.1-44.8 years, BMI 18.4-24.8 kg/m(2), consumed two slices of White Bread, Bürgen Wholemeal and Seeds Bread or Lupin Bread (all 1300 kJ) with 10 g margarine and 30 g strawberry jam. Fullness and hunger responses and were measured before and during the test breakfasts. Glucose and insulin responses (incremental area under each two-hour curve (iAUC)) were calculated. Food intake was measured and energy and nutrient intake determined at a buffet meal two hours later. Subjects consumed significantly less energy after the Bürgen Bread meal compared to the White Bread meal (2548 ± 218 vs. 3040±328kJ, Bürgen Bread vs. White Bread, P<0.05). There were higher fullness responses for the Lupin Bread (P<0.01), and the Bürgen Bread (P<0.05) compared with the White Bread. Lupin Bread and Bürgen Bread produced smaller postprandial glucose responses (79 ± 7, 74 ± 4, 120 ± 10 mmol/L min iAUC, Lupin, Bürgen and White Bread respectively, P<0.01). Differences in insulin responses were also observed (6145 ± 1048, 6471 ± 976, 9674 ± 1431 pmol/L min iAUC, Lupin, Bürgen and White Bread respectively, P<0.01). Equal-energy portions of three different commercially available breads differed in their short-term satiation capacity. Further studies are needed to demonstrate any potential benefit for weight management.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Sansom Institute for Health Research, Division of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide 5000, South Australia, Australia. jennifer.keogh@internode.on.netNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21907743

Citation

Keogh, Jennifer, et al. "Food Intake, Postprandial Glucose, Insulin and Subjective Satiety Responses to Three Different Bread-based Test Meals." Appetite, vol. 57, no. 3, 2011, pp. 707-10.
Keogh J, Atkinson F, Eisenhauer B, et al. Food intake, postprandial glucose, insulin and subjective satiety responses to three different bread-based test meals. Appetite. 2011;57(3):707-10.
Keogh, J., Atkinson, F., Eisenhauer, B., Inamdar, A., & Brand-Miller, J. (2011). Food intake, postprandial glucose, insulin and subjective satiety responses to three different bread-based test meals. Appetite, 57(3), 707-10. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2011.08.015
Keogh J, et al. Food Intake, Postprandial Glucose, Insulin and Subjective Satiety Responses to Three Different Bread-based Test Meals. Appetite. 2011;57(3):707-10. PubMed PMID: 21907743.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Food intake, postprandial glucose, insulin and subjective satiety responses to three different bread-based test meals. AU - Keogh,Jennifer, AU - Atkinson,Fiona, AU - Eisenhauer,Bronwyn, AU - Inamdar,Amar, AU - Brand-Miller,Jennie, Y1 - 2011/09/02/ PY - 2010/07/08/received PY - 2011/06/10/revised PY - 2011/08/23/accepted PY - 2011/9/13/entrez PY - 2011/9/13/pubmed PY - 2012/3/8/medline SP - 707 EP - 10 JF - Appetite JO - Appetite VL - 57 IS - 3 N2 - The effect of bread consumption on overall food intake is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to measure postprandial food intake after a set breakfast containing three different breads. Ten males and 10 females aged 20.1-44.8 years, BMI 18.4-24.8 kg/m(2), consumed two slices of White Bread, Bürgen Wholemeal and Seeds Bread or Lupin Bread (all 1300 kJ) with 10 g margarine and 30 g strawberry jam. Fullness and hunger responses and were measured before and during the test breakfasts. Glucose and insulin responses (incremental area under each two-hour curve (iAUC)) were calculated. Food intake was measured and energy and nutrient intake determined at a buffet meal two hours later. Subjects consumed significantly less energy after the Bürgen Bread meal compared to the White Bread meal (2548 ± 218 vs. 3040±328kJ, Bürgen Bread vs. White Bread, P<0.05). There were higher fullness responses for the Lupin Bread (P<0.01), and the Bürgen Bread (P<0.05) compared with the White Bread. Lupin Bread and Bürgen Bread produced smaller postprandial glucose responses (79 ± 7, 74 ± 4, 120 ± 10 mmol/L min iAUC, Lupin, Bürgen and White Bread respectively, P<0.01). Differences in insulin responses were also observed (6145 ± 1048, 6471 ± 976, 9674 ± 1431 pmol/L min iAUC, Lupin, Bürgen and White Bread respectively, P<0.01). Equal-energy portions of three different commercially available breads differed in their short-term satiation capacity. Further studies are needed to demonstrate any potential benefit for weight management. SN - 1095-8304 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21907743/Food_intake_postprandial_glucose_insulin_and_subjective_satiety_responses_to_three_different_bread_based_test_meals_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0195-6663(11)00559-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -