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Bystanders matter: associations between reinforcing, defending, and the frequency of bullying behavior in classrooms.
J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol. 2011; 40(5):668-76.JC

Abstract

This study investigated whether the bystanders' behaviors (reinforcing the bully vs. defending the victim) in bullying situations are related to the frequency of bullying in a classroom. The sample consisted of 6,764 primary school children from Grades 3 to 5 (9-11 years of age), who were nested within 385 classrooms in 77 schools. The students filled out Internet-based questionnaires in their schools' computer labs. The results from multilevel models showed that defending the victim was negatively associated with the frequency of bullying in a classroom, whereas the effect of reinforcing the bully was positive and strong. The results suggest that bystander responses influence the frequency of bullying, which makes them suitable targets for antibullying interventions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. tiina.salmivallie@utu.fiNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21916686

Citation

Salmivalli, Christina, et al. "Bystanders Matter: Associations Between Reinforcing, Defending, and the Frequency of Bullying Behavior in Classrooms." Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology : the Official Journal for the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, American Psychological Association, Division 53, vol. 40, no. 5, 2011, pp. 668-76.
Salmivalli C, Voeten M, Poskiparta E. Bystanders matter: associations between reinforcing, defending, and the frequency of bullying behavior in classrooms. J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol. 2011;40(5):668-76.
Salmivalli, C., Voeten, M., & Poskiparta, E. (2011). Bystanders matter: associations between reinforcing, defending, and the frequency of bullying behavior in classrooms. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology : the Official Journal for the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, American Psychological Association, Division 53, 40(5), 668-76. https://doi.org/10.1080/15374416.2011.597090
Salmivalli C, Voeten M, Poskiparta E. Bystanders Matter: Associations Between Reinforcing, Defending, and the Frequency of Bullying Behavior in Classrooms. J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol. 2011;40(5):668-76. PubMed PMID: 21916686.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bystanders matter: associations between reinforcing, defending, and the frequency of bullying behavior in classrooms. AU - Salmivalli,Christina, AU - Voeten,Marinus, AU - Poskiparta,Elisa, PY - 2011/9/16/entrez PY - 2011/9/16/pubmed PY - 2012/1/17/medline SP - 668 EP - 76 JF - Journal of clinical child and adolescent psychology : the official journal for the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, American Psychological Association, Division 53 JO - J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol VL - 40 IS - 5 N2 - This study investigated whether the bystanders' behaviors (reinforcing the bully vs. defending the victim) in bullying situations are related to the frequency of bullying in a classroom. The sample consisted of 6,764 primary school children from Grades 3 to 5 (9-11 years of age), who were nested within 385 classrooms in 77 schools. The students filled out Internet-based questionnaires in their schools' computer labs. The results from multilevel models showed that defending the victim was negatively associated with the frequency of bullying in a classroom, whereas the effect of reinforcing the bully was positive and strong. The results suggest that bystander responses influence the frequency of bullying, which makes them suitable targets for antibullying interventions. SN - 1537-4424 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21916686/Bystanders_matter:_associations_between_reinforcing_defending_and_the_frequency_of_bullying_behavior_in_classrooms_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15374416.2011.597090 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -