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Changes in teaching of nontechnical skills, knowledge, aptitudes, and attitudes at US colleges and schools of veterinary medicine between 1999 and 2009.
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2011 Sep 15; 239(6):762-6.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To identify changes in the teaching of nontechnical skills, knowledge, aptitudes, and attitudes (SKAs) at US colleges and schools of veterinary medicine between 1999 and 2009. Design-Cross-sectional survey.

SAMPLE

All 28 US colleges and schools of veterinary medicine. Procedures-An electronic questionnaire was sent to the entire study population. Results were compared with published results of a similar survey performed in 1999 of colleges and schools of veterinary medicine in the United States and Canada.

RESULTS

A 100% response rate was achieved. All respondents were found to offer at least 1 course related to SKAs in 2009, compared with 94% (29/31) of respondents in 1999. A total of 110 such courses were documented, compared with 47 in 1999. In 2009, 26 of the 28 (93%) colleges and schools had at least 1 course related to SKAs that was required, compared with 17 of the 31 (55%) respondents to the 1999 survey. Courses were most commonly incorporated in years 1 and 3 of the curriculum and were most often valued at 1 or 2 credit hours. Forty-one of 67 (61%) courses had been developed since 1999. The most common topics were communication and financial management.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results demonstrated an increased commitment to teaching the SKAs on the part of the US colleges and schools of veterinary medicine. However, the question remains as to how effective these initiatives will be in enhancing the economic success of graduates and the veterinary medical profession in general.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Office of Dean, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21916757

Citation

Harris, Donna L., and James W. Lloyd. "Changes in Teaching of Nontechnical Skills, Knowledge, Aptitudes, and Attitudes at US Colleges and Schools of Veterinary Medicine Between 1999 and 2009." Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, vol. 239, no. 6, 2011, pp. 762-6.
Harris DL, Lloyd JW. Changes in teaching of nontechnical skills, knowledge, aptitudes, and attitudes at US colleges and schools of veterinary medicine between 1999 and 2009. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2011;239(6):762-6.
Harris, D. L., & Lloyd, J. W. (2011). Changes in teaching of nontechnical skills, knowledge, aptitudes, and attitudes at US colleges and schools of veterinary medicine between 1999 and 2009. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 239(6), 762-6. https://doi.org/10.2460/javma.239.6.762
Harris DL, Lloyd JW. Changes in Teaching of Nontechnical Skills, Knowledge, Aptitudes, and Attitudes at US Colleges and Schools of Veterinary Medicine Between 1999 and 2009. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2011 Sep 15;239(6):762-6. PubMed PMID: 21916757.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Changes in teaching of nontechnical skills, knowledge, aptitudes, and attitudes at US colleges and schools of veterinary medicine between 1999 and 2009. AU - Harris,Donna L, AU - Lloyd,James W, PY - 2011/9/16/entrez PY - 2011/9/16/pubmed PY - 2012/3/1/medline SP - 762 EP - 6 JF - Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association JO - J Am Vet Med Assoc VL - 239 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To identify changes in the teaching of nontechnical skills, knowledge, aptitudes, and attitudes (SKAs) at US colleges and schools of veterinary medicine between 1999 and 2009. Design-Cross-sectional survey. SAMPLE: All 28 US colleges and schools of veterinary medicine. Procedures-An electronic questionnaire was sent to the entire study population. Results were compared with published results of a similar survey performed in 1999 of colleges and schools of veterinary medicine in the United States and Canada. RESULTS: A 100% response rate was achieved. All respondents were found to offer at least 1 course related to SKAs in 2009, compared with 94% (29/31) of respondents in 1999. A total of 110 such courses were documented, compared with 47 in 1999. In 2009, 26 of the 28 (93%) colleges and schools had at least 1 course related to SKAs that was required, compared with 17 of the 31 (55%) respondents to the 1999 survey. Courses were most commonly incorporated in years 1 and 3 of the curriculum and were most often valued at 1 or 2 credit hours. Forty-one of 67 (61%) courses had been developed since 1999. The most common topics were communication and financial management. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Results demonstrated an increased commitment to teaching the SKAs on the part of the US colleges and schools of veterinary medicine. However, the question remains as to how effective these initiatives will be in enhancing the economic success of graduates and the veterinary medical profession in general. SN - 1943-569X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21916757/Changes_in_teaching_of_nontechnical_skills_knowledge_aptitudes_and_attitudes_at_US_colleges_and_schools_of_veterinary_medicine_between_1999_and_2009_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -