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A comparison of men's and women's strength to body mass ratio and varus/valgus knee angle during jump landings.
J Sports Sci. 2011 Oct; 29(13):1435-42.JS

Abstract

The purpose of this investigation was to compare valgus/varus knee angles during various jumps and lower body strength between males and females relative to body mass. Seventeen recreationally active females (age: 21.94 ± 2.59 years; height: 1.67 ± 0.05 m; mass: 64.42 ± 8.39 kg; percent body fat: 26.89 ± 6.26%; squat one-repetition maximum: 66.18 ± 19.47 kg; squat to body mass ratio: 1.03 ± 0.28) and 13 recreationally active males (age: 21.69 ± 1.65 years; height: 1.77 ± 0.07 m; mass: 72.39 ± 9.23 kg; percent body fat: 13.15 ± 5.18%; squat one-repetition maximum: 115.77 ± 30.40 kg; squat to body mass ratio: 1.59 ± 0.31) performed a one-repetition maximum in the squat and three of each of the following jumps: countermovement jump, 30 cm drop jump, 45 cm drop jump, and 60 cm drop jump. Knee angles were analysed using videography and body composition was analysed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry to allow for squat to body mass ratio and squat to fat free mass ratio to be calculated. Significant differences (P ≤ 0.05) were found between male and female one-repetition maximum, male and female squat to body mass ratio, and male and female squat to fat free mass ratio. Significant differences were found between male and female varus/valgus knee positions during maximum flexion of the right and left leg in the countermovement jump, drop jump from 30 cm, drop jump from 45 cm, and drop jump from 60 cm. Correlations between varus/valgus knee angles and squat to body mass ratio for all jumps displayed moderate, non-significant relationships (countermovement jump: r = 0.445; drop jump from 30 cm: r = 0.448; drop jump from 45 cm: r = 0.449; drop jump from 60 cm: r = 0.439). In conclusion, males and females have significantly different lower body strength and varus/valgus knee position when landing from jumps.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Neuromuscular Laboratory, Department of Health, Leisure and Exercise Science, Appalachian State University, Boone, North Carolina, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21916796

Citation

Haines, Tracie L., et al. "A Comparison of Men's and Women's Strength to Body Mass Ratio and Varus/valgus Knee Angle During Jump Landings." Journal of Sports Sciences, vol. 29, no. 13, 2011, pp. 1435-42.
Haines TL, McBride JM, Triplett NT, et al. A comparison of men's and women's strength to body mass ratio and varus/valgus knee angle during jump landings. J Sports Sci. 2011;29(13):1435-42.
Haines, T. L., McBride, J. M., Triplett, N. T., Skinner, J. W., Fairbrother, K. R., & Kirby, T. J. (2011). A comparison of men's and women's strength to body mass ratio and varus/valgus knee angle during jump landings. Journal of Sports Sciences, 29(13), 1435-42. https://doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2011.599039
Haines TL, et al. A Comparison of Men's and Women's Strength to Body Mass Ratio and Varus/valgus Knee Angle During Jump Landings. J Sports Sci. 2011;29(13):1435-42. PubMed PMID: 21916796.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A comparison of men's and women's strength to body mass ratio and varus/valgus knee angle during jump landings. AU - Haines,Tracie L, AU - McBride,Jeffrey M, AU - Triplett,N Travis, AU - Skinner,Jared W, AU - Fairbrother,Kimberly R, AU - Kirby,Tyler J, Y1 - 2011/09/15/ PY - 2011/9/16/entrez PY - 2011/9/16/pubmed PY - 2012/3/9/medline SP - 1435 EP - 42 JF - Journal of sports sciences JO - J Sports Sci VL - 29 IS - 13 N2 - The purpose of this investigation was to compare valgus/varus knee angles during various jumps and lower body strength between males and females relative to body mass. Seventeen recreationally active females (age: 21.94 ± 2.59 years; height: 1.67 ± 0.05 m; mass: 64.42 ± 8.39 kg; percent body fat: 26.89 ± 6.26%; squat one-repetition maximum: 66.18 ± 19.47 kg; squat to body mass ratio: 1.03 ± 0.28) and 13 recreationally active males (age: 21.69 ± 1.65 years; height: 1.77 ± 0.07 m; mass: 72.39 ± 9.23 kg; percent body fat: 13.15 ± 5.18%; squat one-repetition maximum: 115.77 ± 30.40 kg; squat to body mass ratio: 1.59 ± 0.31) performed a one-repetition maximum in the squat and three of each of the following jumps: countermovement jump, 30 cm drop jump, 45 cm drop jump, and 60 cm drop jump. Knee angles were analysed using videography and body composition was analysed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry to allow for squat to body mass ratio and squat to fat free mass ratio to be calculated. Significant differences (P ≤ 0.05) were found between male and female one-repetition maximum, male and female squat to body mass ratio, and male and female squat to fat free mass ratio. Significant differences were found between male and female varus/valgus knee positions during maximum flexion of the right and left leg in the countermovement jump, drop jump from 30 cm, drop jump from 45 cm, and drop jump from 60 cm. Correlations between varus/valgus knee angles and squat to body mass ratio for all jumps displayed moderate, non-significant relationships (countermovement jump: r = 0.445; drop jump from 30 cm: r = 0.448; drop jump from 45 cm: r = 0.449; drop jump from 60 cm: r = 0.439). In conclusion, males and females have significantly different lower body strength and varus/valgus knee position when landing from jumps. SN - 1466-447X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21916796/A_comparison_of_men's_and_women's_strength_to_body_mass_ratio_and_varus/valgus_knee_angle_during_jump_landings_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02640414.2011.599039 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -