Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Attitudes toward long-acting reversible contraception among young women seeking abortion.
J Womens Health (Larchmt) 2011; 20(11):1729-35JW

Abstract

AIMS

Use of long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods can reduce rates of unplanned pregnancy and abortion, but for a range of reasons, these methods are underused by young women. A third of women seeking abortion return for a subsequent abortion during their reproductive years and could benefit from using effective long-acting methods. We aimed to explore the attitudes of women seeking abortion toward contraception, with a focus on long-acting methods.

METHODS

Thirty women aged 16-25 (of Maori, Pacific Island, and European ethnicities) were recruited at a public hospital abortion clinic to participate in a semistructured interview. Participants were asked about past use of contraception, their understanding of pregnancy risk, reasons for method choice; and views on long-acting methods. Qualitative data were analyzed using thematic content analysis.

RESULTS

There was a lack of prior knowledge about LARC methods (particularly intrauterine devices [IUD] and implants). Once information was provided, these methods were generally viewed favorably. Cost was a key factor in contraceptive choice, prohibiting choice of the Mirena® levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) or an implant for many women. Other important factors that determined method use and choice were familiarity with methods, whether or not they contained hormones, likely effect on periods, and other side effects.

CONCLUSIONS

Access issues relating to LARC methods (including cost and awareness) need to be urgently addressed. When discussing postabortion contraceptive options, women would benefit from simple explanations about LARC: their appropriateness for women of all reproductive ages, reversible nature, mechanisms of action, impact on menstruation, and other potential side effects.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Women's Health Research Centre, Department of Primary Health Care and General Practice, University of Otago, Wellington South, New Zealand. sally.rose@otago.ac.nzNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21923281

Citation

Rose, Sally B., et al. "Attitudes Toward Long-acting Reversible Contraception Among Young Women Seeking Abortion." Journal of Women's Health (2002), vol. 20, no. 11, 2011, pp. 1729-35.
Rose SB, Cooper AJ, Baker NK, et al. Attitudes toward long-acting reversible contraception among young women seeking abortion. J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2011;20(11):1729-35.
Rose, S. B., Cooper, A. J., Baker, N. K., & Lawton, B. (2011). Attitudes toward long-acting reversible contraception among young women seeking abortion. Journal of Women's Health (2002), 20(11), pp. 1729-35. doi:10.1089/jwh.2010.2658.
Rose SB, et al. Attitudes Toward Long-acting Reversible Contraception Among Young Women Seeking Abortion. J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2011;20(11):1729-35. PubMed PMID: 21923281.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Attitudes toward long-acting reversible contraception among young women seeking abortion. AU - Rose,Sally B, AU - Cooper,Annette J, AU - Baker,Naomi K, AU - Lawton,Beverley, Y1 - 2011/09/16/ PY - 2011/9/20/entrez PY - 2011/9/20/pubmed PY - 2012/3/21/medline SP - 1729 EP - 35 JF - Journal of women's health (2002) JO - J Womens Health (Larchmt) VL - 20 IS - 11 N2 - AIMS: Use of long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods can reduce rates of unplanned pregnancy and abortion, but for a range of reasons, these methods are underused by young women. A third of women seeking abortion return for a subsequent abortion during their reproductive years and could benefit from using effective long-acting methods. We aimed to explore the attitudes of women seeking abortion toward contraception, with a focus on long-acting methods. METHODS: Thirty women aged 16-25 (of Maori, Pacific Island, and European ethnicities) were recruited at a public hospital abortion clinic to participate in a semistructured interview. Participants were asked about past use of contraception, their understanding of pregnancy risk, reasons for method choice; and views on long-acting methods. Qualitative data were analyzed using thematic content analysis. RESULTS: There was a lack of prior knowledge about LARC methods (particularly intrauterine devices [IUD] and implants). Once information was provided, these methods were generally viewed favorably. Cost was a key factor in contraceptive choice, prohibiting choice of the Mirena® levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) or an implant for many women. Other important factors that determined method use and choice were familiarity with methods, whether or not they contained hormones, likely effect on periods, and other side effects. CONCLUSIONS: Access issues relating to LARC methods (including cost and awareness) need to be urgently addressed. When discussing postabortion contraceptive options, women would benefit from simple explanations about LARC: their appropriateness for women of all reproductive ages, reversible nature, mechanisms of action, impact on menstruation, and other potential side effects. SN - 1931-843X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21923281/Attitudes_toward_long_acting_reversible_contraception_among_young_women_seeking_abortion_ L2 - https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/jwh.2010.2658?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -