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Effects of walnut consumption on cognitive performance in young adults.
Br J Nutr. 2012 May; 107(9):1393-401.BJ

Abstract

Walnuts contain a number of potentially neuroprotective compounds like vitamin E, folate, melatonin, several antioxidative polyphenols and significant amounts of n-3 α-linolenic fatty acid. The present study sought to determine the effect of walnuts on verbal and non-verbal reasoning, memory and mood. A total of sixty-four college students were randomly assigned to two treatment sequences in a crossover fashion: walnuts-placebo or placebo-walnuts. Baseline data were collected for non-verbal reasoning, verbal reasoning, memory and mood states. Data were collected again after 8 weeks of intervention. After 6 weeks of washout, the intervention groups followed the diets in reverse order. Data were collected once more at the end of the 8-week intervention period. No significant increases were detected for mood, non-verbal reasoning or memory on the walnut-supplemented diet. However, inferential verbal reasoning increased significantly by 11.2 %, indicating a medium effect size (P = 0.009; d = 0.567). In young, healthy, normal adults, walnuts do not appear to improve memory, mood or non-verbal reasoning abilities. However, walnuts may have the ability to increase inferential reasoning.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition and Wellness, Andrews University, 8475 University Boulevard, Marsh Hall 313, Berrien Springs, MI 49104-0210, USA.Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology, Andrews University, 4195 Administration Drive, Bell Hall 159, Berrien Springs, MI 49104, USA.Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology, Andrews University, 4195 Administration Drive, Bell Hall 159, Berrien Springs, MI 49104, USA.Department of Clinical and Laboratory Sciences, Andrews University, 4270 Administration Drive, Halenz Hall 327, Berrien Springs, MI 49104, USA.Department of Nutrition and Wellness, Andrews University, 8475 University Boulevard, Marsh Hall 313, Berrien Springs, MI 49104-0210, USA.Department of Nutrition and Wellness, Andrews University, 8475 University Boulevard, Marsh Hall 313, Berrien Springs, MI 49104-0210, USA.Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology, Andrews University, 4195 Administration Drive, Bell Hall 159, Berrien Springs, MI 49104, USA.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Loma Linda University, 11234 Anderson Street, Nichol Hall 2005, Loma Linda, CA 92354, USA.Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, Loma Linda University, 11234 Anderson Street, Nichol Hall 1102, Loma Linda, CA 92354, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21923981

Citation

Pribis, Peter, et al. "Effects of Walnut Consumption On Cognitive Performance in Young Adults." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 107, no. 9, 2012, pp. 1393-401.
Pribis P, Bailey RN, Russell AA, et al. Effects of walnut consumption on cognitive performance in young adults. Br J Nutr. 2012;107(9):1393-401.
Pribis, P., Bailey, R. N., Russell, A. A., Kilsby, M. A., Hernandez, M., Craig, W. J., Grajales, T., Shavlik, D. J., & Sabatè, J. (2012). Effects of walnut consumption on cognitive performance in young adults. The British Journal of Nutrition, 107(9), 1393-401. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114511004302
Pribis P, et al. Effects of Walnut Consumption On Cognitive Performance in Young Adults. Br J Nutr. 2012;107(9):1393-401. PubMed PMID: 21923981.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of walnut consumption on cognitive performance in young adults. AU - Pribis,Peter, AU - Bailey,Rudolph N, AU - Russell,Andrew A, AU - Kilsby,Marcia A, AU - Hernandez,Magaly, AU - Craig,Winston J, AU - Grajales,Tevni, AU - Shavlik,David J, AU - Sabatè,Joan, Y1 - 2011/09/19/ PY - 2011/9/20/entrez PY - 2011/9/20/pubmed PY - 2014/5/28/medline SP - 1393 EP - 401 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br J Nutr VL - 107 IS - 9 N2 - Walnuts contain a number of potentially neuroprotective compounds like vitamin E, folate, melatonin, several antioxidative polyphenols and significant amounts of n-3 α-linolenic fatty acid. The present study sought to determine the effect of walnuts on verbal and non-verbal reasoning, memory and mood. A total of sixty-four college students were randomly assigned to two treatment sequences in a crossover fashion: walnuts-placebo or placebo-walnuts. Baseline data were collected for non-verbal reasoning, verbal reasoning, memory and mood states. Data were collected again after 8 weeks of intervention. After 6 weeks of washout, the intervention groups followed the diets in reverse order. Data were collected once more at the end of the 8-week intervention period. No significant increases were detected for mood, non-verbal reasoning or memory on the walnut-supplemented diet. However, inferential verbal reasoning increased significantly by 11.2 %, indicating a medium effect size (P = 0.009; d = 0.567). In young, healthy, normal adults, walnuts do not appear to improve memory, mood or non-verbal reasoning abilities. However, walnuts may have the ability to increase inferential reasoning. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21923981/Effects_of_walnut_consumption_on_cognitive_performance_in_young_adults_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114511004302/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -