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African American parents' attitudes toward HPV vaccination.

Abstract

This study sought to determine knowledge about human papillomaviruses (HPV), vaccination acceptability and intent to vaccinate, and describe the individual characteristics, and sociocultural attitudes that affect African American parents' intent to vaccinate their daughters. Two hundred African Americans completed self-administered surveys that assessed factors that may influence HPV vaccination behavior, HPV and cervical cancer knowledge and risk perception, cultural attitudes, and preferences for location and timing of vaccination. Eligibility criteria included men and women who had a daughter aged 9 to 17 years, whether the daughter had or had not been told that she had an HPV infection. Approximately two-thirds of the African American parents surveyed were aware of HPV and HPV vaccination. Responders were likely to be female, younger, employed, and to have social resources. They were also knowledgeable about HPV, but knowledge did not necessarily lead to vaccination. Among parents knowledgeable about HPV, vaccination status was significantly affected by whether a pediatrician had recommended the vaccine. There were no significant differences in demographic characteristics or sociocultural attitudes between the parents who had vaccinated their daughters and those who had not, although more of the parents who had vaccinated daughters were worried about STIs.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Health Communication Research Laboratory, Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, USA. vthompson@gwbmail.wustl.edu

    ,

    Source

    Ethnicity & disease 21:3 2011 pg 335-41

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    African Americans
    Chi-Square Distribution
    Child
    Female
    Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
    Humans
    Male
    Papillomavirus Infections
    Papillomavirus Vaccines
    Parents
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Uterine Cervical Neoplasms

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    21942167

    Citation

    Thompson, Vetta L Sanders, et al. "African American Parents' Attitudes Toward HPV Vaccination." Ethnicity & Disease, vol. 21, no. 3, 2011, pp. 335-41.
    Thompson VL, Arnold LD, Notaro SR. African American parents' attitudes toward HPV vaccination. Ethn Dis. 2011;21(3):335-41.
    Thompson, V. L., Arnold, L. D., & Notaro, S. R. (2011). African American parents' attitudes toward HPV vaccination. Ethnicity & Disease, 21(3), pp. 335-41.
    Thompson VL, Arnold LD, Notaro SR. African American Parents' Attitudes Toward HPV Vaccination. Ethn Dis. 2011;21(3):335-41. PubMed PMID: 21942167.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - African American parents' attitudes toward HPV vaccination. AU - Thompson,Vetta L Sanders, AU - Arnold,Lauren D, AU - Notaro,Sheri R, PY - 2011/9/28/entrez PY - 2011/9/29/pubmed PY - 2011/11/4/medline SP - 335 EP - 41 JF - Ethnicity & disease JO - Ethn Dis VL - 21 IS - 3 N2 - This study sought to determine knowledge about human papillomaviruses (HPV), vaccination acceptability and intent to vaccinate, and describe the individual characteristics, and sociocultural attitudes that affect African American parents' intent to vaccinate their daughters. Two hundred African Americans completed self-administered surveys that assessed factors that may influence HPV vaccination behavior, HPV and cervical cancer knowledge and risk perception, cultural attitudes, and preferences for location and timing of vaccination. Eligibility criteria included men and women who had a daughter aged 9 to 17 years, whether the daughter had or had not been told that she had an HPV infection. Approximately two-thirds of the African American parents surveyed were aware of HPV and HPV vaccination. Responders were likely to be female, younger, employed, and to have social resources. They were also knowledgeable about HPV, but knowledge did not necessarily lead to vaccination. Among parents knowledgeable about HPV, vaccination status was significantly affected by whether a pediatrician had recommended the vaccine. There were no significant differences in demographic characteristics or sociocultural attitudes between the parents who had vaccinated their daughters and those who had not, although more of the parents who had vaccinated daughters were worried about STIs. SN - 1049-510X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21942167/full_citation/African_American_parents'_attitudes_toward_HPV_vaccination_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/21942167/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -