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Speaking to the trained ear: musical expertise enhances the recognition of emotions in speech prosody.
Emotion. 2011 Oct; 11(5):1021-31.E

Abstract

Language and music are closely related in our minds. Does musical expertise enhance the recognition of emotions in speech prosody? Forty highly trained musicians were compared with 40 musically untrained adults (controls) in the recognition of emotional prosody. For purposes of generalization, the participants were from two age groups, young (18-30 years) and middle adulthood (40-60 years). They were presented with short sentences expressing six emotions-anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, surprise-and neutrality, by prosody alone. In each trial, they performed a forced-choice identification of the expressed emotion (reaction times, RTs, were collected) and an intensity judgment. General intelligence, cognitive control, and personality traits were also assessed. A robust effect of expertise was found: musicians were more accurate than controls, similarly across emotions and age groups. This effect cannot be attributed to socioeducational background, general cognitive or personality characteristics, because these did not differ between musicians and controls; perceived intensity and RTs were also similar in both groups. Furthermore, basic acoustic properties of the stimuli like fundamental frequency and duration were predictive of the participants' responses, and musicians and controls were similarly efficient in using them. Musical expertise was thus associated with cross-domain benefits to emotional prosody. These results indicate that emotional processing in music and in language engages shared resources.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Psychology and Education, University of Porto, Rua Doutor Alfredo Allen, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21942696

Citation

Lima, César F., and São Luís Castro. "Speaking to the Trained Ear: Musical Expertise Enhances the Recognition of Emotions in Speech Prosody." Emotion (Washington, D.C.), vol. 11, no. 5, 2011, pp. 1021-31.
Lima CF, Castro SL. Speaking to the trained ear: musical expertise enhances the recognition of emotions in speech prosody. Emotion. 2011;11(5):1021-31.
Lima, C. F., & Castro, S. L. (2011). Speaking to the trained ear: musical expertise enhances the recognition of emotions in speech prosody. Emotion (Washington, D.C.), 11(5), 1021-31. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0024521
Lima CF, Castro SL. Speaking to the Trained Ear: Musical Expertise Enhances the Recognition of Emotions in Speech Prosody. Emotion. 2011;11(5):1021-31. PubMed PMID: 21942696.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Speaking to the trained ear: musical expertise enhances the recognition of emotions in speech prosody. AU - Lima,César F, AU - Castro,São Luís, PY - 2011/9/28/entrez PY - 2011/9/29/pubmed PY - 2012/2/2/medline SP - 1021 EP - 31 JF - Emotion (Washington, D.C.) JO - Emotion VL - 11 IS - 5 N2 - Language and music are closely related in our minds. Does musical expertise enhance the recognition of emotions in speech prosody? Forty highly trained musicians were compared with 40 musically untrained adults (controls) in the recognition of emotional prosody. For purposes of generalization, the participants were from two age groups, young (18-30 years) and middle adulthood (40-60 years). They were presented with short sentences expressing six emotions-anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, surprise-and neutrality, by prosody alone. In each trial, they performed a forced-choice identification of the expressed emotion (reaction times, RTs, were collected) and an intensity judgment. General intelligence, cognitive control, and personality traits were also assessed. A robust effect of expertise was found: musicians were more accurate than controls, similarly across emotions and age groups. This effect cannot be attributed to socioeducational background, general cognitive or personality characteristics, because these did not differ between musicians and controls; perceived intensity and RTs were also similar in both groups. Furthermore, basic acoustic properties of the stimuli like fundamental frequency and duration were predictive of the participants' responses, and musicians and controls were similarly efficient in using them. Musical expertise was thus associated with cross-domain benefits to emotional prosody. These results indicate that emotional processing in music and in language engages shared resources. SN - 1931-1516 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21942696/Speaking_to_the_trained_ear:_musical_expertise_enhances_the_recognition_of_emotions_in_speech_prosody_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/emo/11/5/1021 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -