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Cancer in nursing homes: characteristics and health-related quality of life among cognitively intact residents with and without cancer.
Cancer Nurs. 2012 Jul-Aug; 35(4):295-301.CN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Studies are lacking on how cancer influences physical, mental, and social functioning beyond comorbidity among older people without cognitive impairment in nursing homes (NHs).

OBJECTIVE

The objective was to study the sociodemographic characteristics and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among NH residents with and without a cancer diagnosis, adjusting for comorbidity.

METHODS

This was a cross-sectional observation study: 30 NHs; 227 residents 65 to 102 years old: 60 with cancer and 167 without, at least 6 months' residence. All had Clinical Dementia Rating of 0.5 or less and could converse. Health-related quality of life was measured using the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey in face-to-face interviews. Sociodemographic variables and medical diagnoses were obtained from records. Possible differences in HRQOL, controlled for age, gender, marital status, education, length of stay, and comorbidity, were examined by multiple linear regression analyses.

RESULTS

The most common cancer diagnoses were breast cancer among women (20%) and prostate cancer among men (12%). More residents with cancer were married (P = .007), reported more bodily pain (P = .17) and scored lower on all other HRQOL subscales, except for role-emotional. General health was worse than that of the residents without cancer (P = .04) after adjusting for sociodemographic variables but not for comorbidity (P = .06).

CONCLUSION

Cognitively intact NH residents with cancer reported more pain and worse general health but better role limitation related to emotional problems compared with residents without cancer. The difference in general health was partly due to comorbidity.

IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE

Nurses should pay attention to HRQOL among NH residents with cancer and especially observe and ensure pain treatment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty for Health and Social Sciences, Bergen University College, Bergen, Norway. jorunn.drageset@hib.noNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21946900

Citation

Drageset, Jorunn, et al. "Cancer in Nursing Homes: Characteristics and Health-related Quality of Life Among Cognitively Intact Residents With and Without Cancer." Cancer Nursing, vol. 35, no. 4, 2012, pp. 295-301.
Drageset J, Eide GE, Ranhoff AH. Cancer in nursing homes: characteristics and health-related quality of life among cognitively intact residents with and without cancer. Cancer Nurs. 2012;35(4):295-301.
Drageset, J., Eide, G. E., & Ranhoff, A. H. (2012). Cancer in nursing homes: characteristics and health-related quality of life among cognitively intact residents with and without cancer. Cancer Nursing, 35(4), 295-301. https://doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0b013e31822e7cb8
Drageset J, Eide GE, Ranhoff AH. Cancer in Nursing Homes: Characteristics and Health-related Quality of Life Among Cognitively Intact Residents With and Without Cancer. Cancer Nurs. 2012 Jul-Aug;35(4):295-301. PubMed PMID: 21946900.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cancer in nursing homes: characteristics and health-related quality of life among cognitively intact residents with and without cancer. AU - Drageset,Jorunn, AU - Eide,Geir Egil, AU - Ranhoff,Anette Hylen, PY - 2011/9/28/entrez PY - 2011/9/29/pubmed PY - 2012/10/13/medline SP - 295 EP - 301 JF - Cancer nursing JO - Cancer Nurs VL - 35 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Studies are lacking on how cancer influences physical, mental, and social functioning beyond comorbidity among older people without cognitive impairment in nursing homes (NHs). OBJECTIVE: The objective was to study the sociodemographic characteristics and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among NH residents with and without a cancer diagnosis, adjusting for comorbidity. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional observation study: 30 NHs; 227 residents 65 to 102 years old: 60 with cancer and 167 without, at least 6 months' residence. All had Clinical Dementia Rating of 0.5 or less and could converse. Health-related quality of life was measured using the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey in face-to-face interviews. Sociodemographic variables and medical diagnoses were obtained from records. Possible differences in HRQOL, controlled for age, gender, marital status, education, length of stay, and comorbidity, were examined by multiple linear regression analyses. RESULTS: The most common cancer diagnoses were breast cancer among women (20%) and prostate cancer among men (12%). More residents with cancer were married (P = .007), reported more bodily pain (P = .17) and scored lower on all other HRQOL subscales, except for role-emotional. General health was worse than that of the residents without cancer (P = .04) after adjusting for sociodemographic variables but not for comorbidity (P = .06). CONCLUSION: Cognitively intact NH residents with cancer reported more pain and worse general health but better role limitation related to emotional problems compared with residents without cancer. The difference in general health was partly due to comorbidity. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Nurses should pay attention to HRQOL among NH residents with cancer and especially observe and ensure pain treatment. SN - 1538-9804 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21946900/Cancer_in_nursing_homes:_characteristics_and_health_related_quality_of_life_among_cognitively_intact_residents_with_and_without_cancer_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0b013e31822e7cb8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -