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Hyperuricaemia and gout.
J R Coll Physicians Edinb. 2011 Sep; 41(3):229-33.JR

Abstract

Gout is increasing in prevalence throughout the world, particularly in developed countries. The causes are dietary--purine-rich foods, high saturated fats, fructose-containing drinks and alcohol. Gout is also drug-related and associated with increased obesity, hypertension, insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. Although very readily treated, there is evidence that physicians fail to optimise the treatment and achieve low enough serum urate levels, while patients fail to comply with the treatment and dietary advice. Standard treatment of acute attacks is with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, colchicine or steroids. The standard urate-lowering agents are allopurinol and uricosuric agents. Newer urate lowering agents are now available for refractory gout. Increased understanding of the membrane transporters involved in urate excretion in the kidney and the genes that control them and of the way that sodium urate crystals cause inflammation via the innate immune system and the inflammasome offers hope for new therapeutic approaches.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Rheumatology, University College Hospital, London, UK. Mike.Shipley@uclh.nhs.uk

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21949921

Citation

Shipley, M. "Hyperuricaemia and Gout." The Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh, vol. 41, no. 3, 2011, pp. 229-33.
Shipley M. Hyperuricaemia and gout. J R Coll Physicians Edinb. 2011;41(3):229-33.
Shipley, M. (2011). Hyperuricaemia and gout. The Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh, 41(3), 229-33. https://doi.org/10.4997/JRCPE.2011.311
Shipley M. Hyperuricaemia and Gout. J R Coll Physicians Edinb. 2011;41(3):229-33. PubMed PMID: 21949921.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hyperuricaemia and gout. A1 - Shipley,M, PY - 2011/9/28/entrez PY - 2011/9/29/pubmed PY - 2012/4/6/medline SP - 229 EP - 33 JF - The journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh JO - J R Coll Physicians Edinb VL - 41 IS - 3 N2 - Gout is increasing in prevalence throughout the world, particularly in developed countries. The causes are dietary--purine-rich foods, high saturated fats, fructose-containing drinks and alcohol. Gout is also drug-related and associated with increased obesity, hypertension, insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. Although very readily treated, there is evidence that physicians fail to optimise the treatment and achieve low enough serum urate levels, while patients fail to comply with the treatment and dietary advice. Standard treatment of acute attacks is with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, colchicine or steroids. The standard urate-lowering agents are allopurinol and uricosuric agents. Newer urate lowering agents are now available for refractory gout. Increased understanding of the membrane transporters involved in urate excretion in the kidney and the genes that control them and of the way that sodium urate crystals cause inflammation via the innate immune system and the inflammasome offers hope for new therapeutic approaches. SN - 2042-8189 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21949921/Hyperuricaemia_and_gout_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/gout.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -