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Relationship between post-traumatic stress disorder and diabetes among 105,180 asylum seekers in the Netherlands.
Eur J Public Health. 2012 Oct; 22(5):658-62.EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Several reports have demonstrated a relationship between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) mainly in combat veterans. The relationship between PTSD and T2DM has not been evaluated among vulnerable migrant populations. The main objective of this study was therefore to assess the relationship between PTSD and T2DM among asylum seekers in the Netherlands.

METHODS

Analysis of a national electronic database of the Dutch Community Health Services for Asylum seekers aged≥18 years (N=105,180).

RESULTS

Asylum seekers with PTSD had a higher prevalence of T2DM compared with those without PTSD. The age-adjusted prevalence ratios (APR) were 1.40 (95% CI, 1.12-1.76) in men and 1.22 (95% CI, 0.95-1.56) in women compared with individuals without PTSD, respectively. There was an interaction between PTSD and comorbid depression (P<0.05) in men and women, indicating that the effect of PTSD and comorbid depression on T2DM differed. When the analyses were stratified by depression status, among non-depressed group, individuals with PTSD had a higher prevalence of T2DM compared with those without PTSD [APR=1.47 (95% CI, 1.15-1.87) in men and APR=1.27 (95% CI, 0.97-1.66) in women]. Among the depressed individuals, however, there was no association between PTSD and T2DM [APR=0.87 (95% CI, 0.43-1.76) in men, and APR=1.00, (95% CI, 0.54-1.83) in women].

CONCLUSION

The findings suggest that history of PTSD is related to high levels of T2DM among asylum seekers independent of comorbid depression. Clinicians and policy makers need to take PTSD into account when assessing and treating diabetes among vulnerable migrant populations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. c.o.agyemang@amc.uva.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Evaluation Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21953061

Citation

Agyemang, Charles, et al. "Relationship Between Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Diabetes Among 105,180 Asylum Seekers in the Netherlands." European Journal of Public Health, vol. 22, no. 5, 2012, pp. 658-62.
Agyemang C, Goosen S, Anujuo K, et al. Relationship between post-traumatic stress disorder and diabetes among 105,180 asylum seekers in the Netherlands. Eur J Public Health. 2012;22(5):658-62.
Agyemang, C., Goosen, S., Anujuo, K., & Ogedegbe, G. (2012). Relationship between post-traumatic stress disorder and diabetes among 105,180 asylum seekers in the Netherlands. European Journal of Public Health, 22(5), 658-62.
Agyemang C, et al. Relationship Between Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Diabetes Among 105,180 Asylum Seekers in the Netherlands. Eur J Public Health. 2012;22(5):658-62. PubMed PMID: 21953061.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relationship between post-traumatic stress disorder and diabetes among 105,180 asylum seekers in the Netherlands. AU - Agyemang,Charles, AU - Goosen,Simone, AU - Anujuo,Kenneth, AU - Ogedegbe,Gbenga, Y1 - 2011/09/27/ PY - 2011/9/29/entrez PY - 2011/9/29/pubmed PY - 2012/12/20/medline SP - 658 EP - 62 JF - European journal of public health JO - Eur J Public Health VL - 22 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Several reports have demonstrated a relationship between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) mainly in combat veterans. The relationship between PTSD and T2DM has not been evaluated among vulnerable migrant populations. The main objective of this study was therefore to assess the relationship between PTSD and T2DM among asylum seekers in the Netherlands. METHODS: Analysis of a national electronic database of the Dutch Community Health Services for Asylum seekers aged≥18 years (N=105,180). RESULTS: Asylum seekers with PTSD had a higher prevalence of T2DM compared with those without PTSD. The age-adjusted prevalence ratios (APR) were 1.40 (95% CI, 1.12-1.76) in men and 1.22 (95% CI, 0.95-1.56) in women compared with individuals without PTSD, respectively. There was an interaction between PTSD and comorbid depression (P<0.05) in men and women, indicating that the effect of PTSD and comorbid depression on T2DM differed. When the analyses were stratified by depression status, among non-depressed group, individuals with PTSD had a higher prevalence of T2DM compared with those without PTSD [APR=1.47 (95% CI, 1.15-1.87) in men and APR=1.27 (95% CI, 0.97-1.66) in women]. Among the depressed individuals, however, there was no association between PTSD and T2DM [APR=0.87 (95% CI, 0.43-1.76) in men, and APR=1.00, (95% CI, 0.54-1.83) in women]. CONCLUSION: The findings suggest that history of PTSD is related to high levels of T2DM among asylum seekers independent of comorbid depression. Clinicians and policy makers need to take PTSD into account when assessing and treating diabetes among vulnerable migrant populations. SN - 1464-360X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21953061/Relationship_between_post_traumatic_stress_disorder_and_diabetes_among_105180_asylum_seekers_in_the_Netherlands_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/eurpub/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/eurpub/ckr138 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -