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Evidence used to support the achievement and maintenance of elimination of rubella and congenital rubella syndrome in the United States.
J Infect Dis. 2011 Sep 01; 204 Suppl 2:S593-7.JI

Abstract

On 29 October 2004, an expert panel was convened to review the status of elimination of rubella and congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) in the United States. Primarily based on 5 types of information presented--epidemiology of reported cases, molecular epidemiology, seroprevalence, vaccine coverage, and adequacy of surveillance--the panel unanimously agreed that rubella virus is no longer endemic in the United States. Since 2004, new data continue to support the conclusion that elimination has been achieved and maintained. In documenting elimination in the United States, each of the 5 types of data provided evidence for elimination and collectively provided much stronger evidence than any one type could individually. As countries document the elimination of rubella and CRS, many sources and types of data will likely be necessary. Rigorous data evaluation must be conducted to look for inconsistencies among the available data. To maintain elimination, countries should maintain high vaccine coverage, adequate surveillance, and rapid response to outbreaks.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Global Immunization Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, USA. sreef@cdc.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21954252

Citation

Reef, Susan E., et al. "Evidence Used to Support the Achievement and Maintenance of Elimination of Rubella and Congenital Rubella Syndrome in the United States." The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 204 Suppl 2, 2011, pp. S593-7.
Reef SE, Redd SB, Abernathy E, et al. Evidence used to support the achievement and maintenance of elimination of rubella and congenital rubella syndrome in the United States. J Infect Dis. 2011;204 Suppl 2:S593-7.
Reef, S. E., Redd, S. B., Abernathy, E., Kutty, P., & Icenogle, J. P. (2011). Evidence used to support the achievement and maintenance of elimination of rubella and congenital rubella syndrome in the United States. The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 204 Suppl 2, S593-7. https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jir420
Reef SE, et al. Evidence Used to Support the Achievement and Maintenance of Elimination of Rubella and Congenital Rubella Syndrome in the United States. J Infect Dis. 2011 Sep 1;204 Suppl 2:S593-7. PubMed PMID: 21954252.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evidence used to support the achievement and maintenance of elimination of rubella and congenital rubella syndrome in the United States. AU - Reef,Susan E, AU - Redd,Susan B, AU - Abernathy,Emily, AU - Kutty,Preeta, AU - Icenogle,Joseph P, PY - 2011/9/29/entrez PY - 2011/10/5/pubmed PY - 2011/11/16/medline SP - S593 EP - 7 JF - The Journal of infectious diseases JO - J. Infect. Dis. VL - 204 Suppl 2 N2 - On 29 October 2004, an expert panel was convened to review the status of elimination of rubella and congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) in the United States. Primarily based on 5 types of information presented--epidemiology of reported cases, molecular epidemiology, seroprevalence, vaccine coverage, and adequacy of surveillance--the panel unanimously agreed that rubella virus is no longer endemic in the United States. Since 2004, new data continue to support the conclusion that elimination has been achieved and maintained. In documenting elimination in the United States, each of the 5 types of data provided evidence for elimination and collectively provided much stronger evidence than any one type could individually. As countries document the elimination of rubella and CRS, many sources and types of data will likely be necessary. Rigorous data evaluation must be conducted to look for inconsistencies among the available data. To maintain elimination, countries should maintain high vaccine coverage, adequate surveillance, and rapid response to outbreaks. SN - 1537-6613 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21954252/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jid/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/infdis/jir420 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -