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Sensitivity and specificity of the head-shaking test for detecting vestibular system abnormalities.
Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 1990 Jul; 99(7 Pt 1):539-42.AO

Abstract

The head-shaking nystagmus (HSN) test has been reported to be a sensitive screening test for the presence of peripheral and central vestibular system disease. Previous investigations have utilized few subjects who were drawn from well-defined patient populations. The purpose of the present investigation was twofold: first, to determine the prevalence of HSN in a large unselected population of dizzy patients seen in an otology and neurotology practice, and second, to determine the sensitivity and specificity of this evaluation in the detection of vestibular system abnormalities as reflected by results of electronystagmography and rotary chair testing. The results of the investigation have suggested that the HSN test has a 27% sensitivity and an 85% specificity. The HSN test yields an acceptable number of false positives (15%) and an unacceptably large number of false negatives (73%).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Audiology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan 48202.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2195962

Citation

Jacobson, G P., et al. "Sensitivity and Specificity of the Head-shaking Test for Detecting Vestibular System Abnormalities." The Annals of Otology, Rhinology, and Laryngology, vol. 99, no. 7 Pt 1, 1990, pp. 539-42.
Jacobson GP, Newman CW, Safadi I. Sensitivity and specificity of the head-shaking test for detecting vestibular system abnormalities. Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 1990;99(7 Pt 1):539-42.
Jacobson, G. P., Newman, C. W., & Safadi, I. (1990). Sensitivity and specificity of the head-shaking test for detecting vestibular system abnormalities. The Annals of Otology, Rhinology, and Laryngology, 99(7 Pt 1), 539-42.
Jacobson GP, Newman CW, Safadi I. Sensitivity and Specificity of the Head-shaking Test for Detecting Vestibular System Abnormalities. Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 1990;99(7 Pt 1):539-42. PubMed PMID: 2195962.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sensitivity and specificity of the head-shaking test for detecting vestibular system abnormalities. AU - Jacobson,G P, AU - Newman,C W, AU - Safadi,I, PY - 1990/7/1/pubmed PY - 1990/7/1/medline PY - 1990/7/1/entrez SP - 539 EP - 42 JF - The Annals of otology, rhinology, and laryngology JO - Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol VL - 99 IS - 7 Pt 1 N2 - The head-shaking nystagmus (HSN) test has been reported to be a sensitive screening test for the presence of peripheral and central vestibular system disease. Previous investigations have utilized few subjects who were drawn from well-defined patient populations. The purpose of the present investigation was twofold: first, to determine the prevalence of HSN in a large unselected population of dizzy patients seen in an otology and neurotology practice, and second, to determine the sensitivity and specificity of this evaluation in the detection of vestibular system abnormalities as reflected by results of electronystagmography and rotary chair testing. The results of the investigation have suggested that the HSN test has a 27% sensitivity and an 85% specificity. The HSN test yields an acceptable number of false positives (15%) and an unacceptably large number of false negatives (73%). SN - 0003-4894 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2195962/Sensitivity_and_specificity_of_the_head_shaking_test_for_detecting_vestibular_system_abnormalities_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/000348949009900708?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -